War of the Rebellion: Serial 053 Page 0086 KY.,SW.VA.,TENN.,MISS.,N.ALA., AND N.GA. Chapter XLII.

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HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES, Anderson's Cross-Roads, October 4, 1863.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, Department of the Cumberland:

COLONEL: The road over the mountain at this point has been almost impassable, but is rapidly being improved. Several long trains are slowly working over. Another road crosses the ridge some 6 miles north of this, near Dunlap. General Brannan's train moved up that way this morning. I would not forbid its going, but added two companies to its escort as far as the foot of the mountain on this side. Unless permitted by you I shall forbid all future passage that way, knowing nothing of its escort as far as the foot of the mountain on this side. Unless permitted by you I shall forbid all future passage that way, knowing nothing of its safety. If the route is secure, it would expedite much. Please instruct me in this.

No signs of rebels since yesterday, save an occasional skulking prisoner being brought in.

Respectfully, &c.,

JOHN TILLSON,

Colonel Tenth Illinois Infantry, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Chattanooga, Tenn., October 4, 1863.

Colonel JOHN TILLSON:

You will take position with your brigade to protect to the best advantage the trains passing to and from Bridgeport for this place. The foot of the mountains on the eastern side is probably the most favorable; however, of the roads near Therman and Anderson are regarded as vital points. In addition to guarding these points, you will exercise a supervisory control of all passing trains; that there is no neglect, delay, nor confusion in parking, ascending and descending the mountain; that the quartermasters, wagon-masters, teamsters, and escort are always in their proper places, vigilant and strictly attentive to their duties. You will make daily reports to these headquarters of all irregularities, abuses, neglects on the part of Government employes, and any and every unnecessary detention of trains. Intrench your position with abatis or rails, so as to keep off cavalry, and cover your own men and train.

By command of Major-General Rosecrans:

WM. McMICHAEL,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS NINETY-SECOND ILLINOIS VOLUNTEERS, Harrison's Landing, October 4, 1863.

Major SINCLAIR:

MAJOR: All quiet this a.m. Last night four shots were fired at my guards at Igou's, but no attempt to cross was made on our returning the fire. I am ordered directly from department headquarters to place myself under the command of ColonelDaniel McCook, consequently my reports will be to him hereafter, instead of General Mitchell. I have been guarding the river for 20 miles above