War of the Rebellion: Serial 053 Page 0083 Chapter XLII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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I have the honor to state further that my reports of effective force show only the men in camp and ready for immediate effective duty on the morning the report is made; and reports made when a contest is imminent show only the number of men with guns we have ready to use at once.

The report might differ 100 or 200 men, or more or less daily, if made daily, as details taking them out of camp are not counted. If a regiment is sent out to guard a train, that regiment is not counted in the effective force while gone, as my understanding of a proper report of effective force is the force you have in hand ready to throw into line of battle at a moment's notice, or for any duty they may be called upon for.

I am, with much respect, your obedient servant,

M. P. BESTOW,

Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.

CAPTAIN: As the general is out I send this forward without waiting his signature.

Yours, truly,

M. P. BESTOW,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. SECOND DIVISION, TWENTY-FIRST ARMY CORPS, Chattanooga, October 4, 1863.

[Captain P. P. OLDERSHAW,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Twenty-first Army Corps:]

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to make the following statement to account for the difference between the effective force reports of the 28th ultimo and 1st instant:

The difference in the reports of the First Brigade was 6 officers and 122 men less on October 1 than on September 28, accounted for by the fact that three companies of the Ninetieth Ohio were absent as train guards to Bridgeport [6 officers, 122 men].

The difference in reports of Second Brigade was 1 officer lost and 27 men gained. The officer became sick, and 27 men recovered from sick report and from wounds.

The difference between the loss in First Brigade and gain in Second Brigade is 7 officers and 95 men.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. W. NORTON,

Captain and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

P. S.-The general is asleep, which I hope will excuse my again sending up a communication signed by myself.

D. W. NORTON.

FORT DUNLAP, October 4, 1863.

Brigadier-General WOOD,

Comdg. First Div., Twenty-first Army Corps:

GENERAL: After I made my report on yesterday evening, six of the seven regiments that made their appearance on the crest of the