War of the Rebellion: Serial 053 Page 0071 Chapter XLII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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the train up at Mitchell's, which is about 8 miles from this. We immediately started out, and soon after getting upon the main road we began meeting teamsters and passing broken wagons; we kept on. Expect, by the reports of the scared teamsters, soon to meet the enemy. We finally halted about 15 miles up, and sent one company on and found the infantry of Colonel McCook's command. The force of the enemy that had shown there appearing to be small, we returned to our post here to picket this place about 12 midnight.

We have nothing from our brigade, but heard of them last at Bolivar. I know of no other way than to go by Bridgeport.

L. S. SCRANTON,

Major, Commanding Second Michigan Cavalry.

HDQRS. NINETY-SECOND ILLINOIS VOLUNTEERS, Harrison's Landing, Tenn., October 3, 1863-7 a.m.

Major SINCLAIR,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

MAJOR: All quiet. A scout I sent 18 miles up the river reports all the fords unguarded. The enemy, however, are guarding them all on the other side. With three of my largest companies on courier duty and the fords above all left open, I will have all I can do to watch them, which I will for 10 miles above, but cannot hope to make a successful resistance if they desire to cross in force.

Most respectfully,

S. D. ATKINS,

Colonel Ninety-second Illinois.

P. S.-Captain Dunham, at Nelson's Ferry, just reports the enemy, in quite large force, marching up the river on the other side, commencing at 1 a.m. this morning and continuing a long time in passing that point.

Respectfully,

S. D. A.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Chattanooga, October 3, 1863.

Brig. General J. G. SPEARS:

We have sent you the Fourth Ohio Cavalry and will soon send you a few more. The general commanding directs you to use the utmost exertion to prevent the crossing of any force of the enemy, and to watch any attempts he may make to cross above or below you. Report what you may learn of importance to us. Burnside will soon close down to you, and then the river will be secured.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. A. GARFIELD,

Brigadier-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Chattanooga, October 3, 1863-1.30 p.m.

Major-General HOOKER,

Stevenson, Ala.:

You were advised of a heavy cavalry raid intended on our railroad. Order promptly all the Twelfth Corps to stop on the railroad - say.