War of the Rebellion: Serial 053 Page 0037 Chapter XLII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

HDQRS.14TH ARMY CORPS, INSPECTOR-GENERAL'S DEPT., Chattanooga, October 2, 1863.

Major General GEORGE H. THOMAS,

Commanding Fourteenth Army Corps:

GENERAL: I have the honor to make the following report: Lieutenant Reppert, of your escort, reports to me that from the house of Mr. Chandler, on the hill, between the hours of 10 and 11 a.m., he saw rebel troops, both infantry and artillery, moving on the top of Missionary Ridge, from our left in direction of Rossville, and that they had been moving for nearly an hour.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. D. BARKER,

Acting Assistant Inspector-General, 14th Army Corps.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Chattanooga, October 2, 1863.

Major General G. H. THOMAS,

Commanding Fourteenth Army Corps:

GENERAL: The general commanding directs me to say that General Smith has been riding your front to-day, and reports a small piece of timber in front of General Rousseau and Colonel Grose which he thinks should be cut down. Under the general directions heretofore given, the general commanding had supposed this was done. It is the woods to the left of Moore's road to which the general commanding wishes to direct your attention.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

FRANK S. BOND,

Major and Aide-de-Camp.

HDQRS. 14TH ARMY CORPS, PROVOST-MARSHAL'S OFFICE, October 2, 1863.

ColonelG. E. FLYNT,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

Inclosed I send you a statement of R. H. Cliff, wagon-master to headquarters train, in relation to the capture of a train at Anderson this morning.

I remain, colonel, your obedient servant,

J. G. PARKHURST,

Colonel and Provost-Marshal.

[Inclosure.]

PROVOST-MARSHAL'S OFFICE, October 2, 1863.

Statement of Richard H. Cliff, wagon-master to headquarters train, Fourteenth Army Corps:

Says he left Stevenson September 30, in the morning, in charge of eight wagons loaded with rations, in company with a large supply train, and reached Anderson's, at the foot of Walden's Ridge, about 9 o'clock on the morning of the 2nd [this morning]; that when he reached Anderson's he heard a train had been burned by the enemy at the next pass above, about 7 miles farther up the valley. About half an hour after this report reached him, the enemy made an attack upon the train at Anderson's. The enemy were about 2,000