War of the Rebellion: Serial 053 Page 0031 Chapter XLII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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CORINTH, October 2, 1863.

Major-General HURLBUT:

The following dispatch just received:

LA GRANGE, October 2.

Brig. General E. A. CARR,

Commanding:

I have received reliable information that General Joseph E. Johnston and General Stephen D. Lee arrived at Oxford, Miss., on Wednesday last, and are organizing a force to attack this place and Corinth within next ten days. Troops are pouring in to them from the south, and they had ten days' rations of jerked beef. At that time they were also arming all their troops, who had shotguns, with new Austrian rifles.

If more troops could be spared for this place it would be well enough to send them here without delay. The four pieces of artillery now here are nearly useless. Effective strength of infantry now here, 800; of cavalry, 500; the force at Grand Junction consists of the Sixth Tennessee Cavalry, about 600. I have appointed Captain F. Welker chief of artillery for this division. Request that he may be ordered to report with his battery.

Respectfully,

T. W. SWEENY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

My scouts have reported for several days that the enemy was building bridges across the Tallahatchie, but I supposed it to be a ruse to keep us from moving. I had assigned Welker's battery to the La Grange brigade, but am holding it here for the present to await developments.

E. A. CARR,

Brigadier-General.

CHATTANOOGA, TENN., October 2, 1863-8 p.m. [Received 1 p.m., 3rd.]

Hon. E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

Enemy's cavalry struck the supply train of this army on the Sequatchie this morning. If the troops from east left their trains behind them, as I suppose, the wagons and mules had better be forwarded by rail to Nashville. They will be needed on this long line. When General Burnside moved west his trains went with him, and the sooner they arrive the sooner the troops can be supplied and move with activity and effect. It is reported that 200 or more wagons were captured, but we have only the earliest rumors. Cavalry and infantry are moving in such positions that I have hopes that the rebels will yet pay dearly for their success.

M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General.

INDIANAPOLIS, October 2, 1863. [Received 8.30 p.m.]

Hon. E. M. STANTON:

I respectfully request that General Lew. Wallace may be allowed to visit Chattanooga.

O. P. MORTON,

Governor of Indiana.