War of the Rebellion: Serial 052 Page 0986 KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., N. ALA., AND N. GA. Chapter XLII.

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SEVEN MILES FROM CHATTANOOGA,

September 6, 1863-2 p.m.

Captain P. P. OLDERSHAW,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: There is evidence that the enemy is in force immediately in my front. I learn he is strongly posted in a formidable position where the point of Lookout Mountain just against the river. This position commands the railroad and the common road, both of which pass between the spur of Lookout Mountain and the river. This topography will give you and idea of the strength of the position which bars my farther progress. The information about the position of the enemy I have obtained from various sources which seem to be reliable.

I marched 10 miles to-day. The road is bad but practicable. I would urge General Crittenden to have an exploration made without delay, to determine a practicable road from his position to the road leading from Trenton to Chattanooga. As my position here, if the enemy is in force in Chattanooga, is hazardous, all the routes leading here should be promptly explored, and some part of the force with General Crittenden should be advanced at once, at least in supporting distance.

The enemy's signal parties of Lookout Mountain can be seen plainly briskly engaged in signaling.

Is not General Thomas ordered to advance a division to the junction of the Trenton and Chattanooga Railroad with the Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad? My recollection of the order is that he is so directed, but he has not done it. If he is so ordered cannot you urge the movement forward? Ask General Crittenden to see to this.

Let me hear from you promptly.

Respectfully, &c.,

TH. J. WOOD,

Brigadier-General of Volunteers, Commanding.

SEVEN MILES FROM CHATTANOOGA,

September 6, 1863-4 p.m.

(Received 7 p.m. at junction of Murphy's Valley road and Nickajack.)

Captain P. P. OLDERSHAW,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: Under some information given me by Colonel Palmer, which leads me to suppose that General Crittenden was advanced as far as the junction of the Naylor's road (good wagon road) with the Trenton Valley, I sent a courier to find you in that direction; but I now learn that Colonel Palmer was entirely mistaken in your position, and that you were at the junction of Murphy's Valley road with the Naylor road. I hence write again.

I skirmished with the enemy for several miles to-day. I am satisfied the enemy is in force in my front. He is strongly posted, according to all the information I can get, on the spur of Lookout Mountain where it just against the river-a position which commands the railroad and common road, both of which pass between