War of the Rebellion: Serial 052 Page 0979 Chapter XLII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, TWENTY-FIRST ARMY CORPS,

Jasper, September 2, 1863.

Brigadier-General WOOD,

Commanding Division:

GENERAL: I have the honor to report that the division is supplied with rations up to and including the 5th instant. I have ten days' on hand and eight days' left at Therman to come forward on that train.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES Mcdonald,

Captain and Commissary of Subsistence

[Indorsement.]

Captain OLDERSHAW:

The rations left at Therman I hope will be here this evening or night sometime, but perhaps they may not be here till to-morrow, as the wagons were sent up yesterday morning with supplies to General Wagner. When these get up I will have rations on hand to the 23rd instant inclusive, which could be made to do to the 30th, perhaps longer if we should meet with no loss, but in an active campaign there are so many causes of wastage and loss of rations it is difficult to say how long exactly a given supply may be made to run.

Respectfully, &c.,

TH. J. WOOD,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, TWENTY-FIRST ARMY CORPS,

Near Jasper, September 2, 1863-4 p.m.

Captain OLDERSHAW,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: First, am I to understand by the order to send the train to Bridgeport, all my wagons, baggage train, and supply train, or only the latter? Second, is the artillery to follow the troops to Shellmound, or to go to Bridgeport?

I will send in report in regard to the rations so soon as the commissary can get it ready. It is now 4 o'clock and rations are being issued to the troops, and by the time it is done, it will be nearly or quite night-fall, before which time the brigade cannot move, hence little will be gained by starting this afternoon; therefore if the order is not imperative to move the brigade this afternoon, I would suggest (and would greatly prefer) to move it at an early hour to-morrow morning, reaching the river by an hour of sun (say 6 a.m.). I am sure no time would be lost by this arrangement, and the troops would go in better and more comfortable condition. Let me hear at once.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

TH. J. WOOD,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.