War of the Rebellion: Serial 052 Page 0950 KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., N. ALA., AND N. GA. Chapter XLII.

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HEADQUARTERS FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Chattanooga, September 30, 1863.

Brigadier General J. A. GARFIELD,

Chief of Staff:

The officer in charge of picket in front of Major-General Negley and Major-General Reynolds reports that between the hours of 9 p.m. and 12 last night he heard artillery passing from the enemy's left to the Rossville road, and that the sound seemed to die away in the distance on the Rossville road, and that he could distinctly hear the jar of the artillery as if coming down off the mountain. Also, that he could hear artillery or wagons passing from left of Rossville road into the road, dying away in the distance.

Colonel Lister, in charge of pickets on our left, reports that between the hours of 9 p.m. and 12 he heard the sound as of artillery or wagons passing to our left.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. H. THOMAS.

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ELEVENTH INDIANA BATTERY,

Chattanooga, September 30, 1863.

Captain GEORGE LEE,

A. A. G., Third Division, Twentieth Army Corps:

CAPTAIN: In obedience to orders from Major-General Sheridan, I examined the condition of the battery horses of this division and find it as follows:

Battery C, First Missouri Light Artillery: Horses yet serviceable, but in poor condition, on account of short feed, amounting to hardly half of proper allowance.

Battery C, First Illinois Light Artillery: Horses yet serviceable, but very poor; feed short, half of proper allowance.

Eleventh Indiana Battery: Horses not fit for work on account of great weakness, caused by too short allowance of feed, it amounting to but one-fourth of proper rations.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. SUTERMEISTER,

Captain Eleventh Indiana Battery.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Chattanooga, September 30, 1863.

Major General G. GRANGER:

The general commanding directs you to hold Colonel McCook's brigade in readiness to support General Crook if it shall be necessary. Direct him in that case to receive orders from General Crook, and if he leaves his present position he must leave a small force to watch the river in the vicinity of his present position. He may be needed very soon, as General Crook has been fighting to-day to resist the crossing of a rebel force at Washington.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. A. GARFIELD,

Brigadier-General and Chief of Staff.