War of the Rebellion: Serial 052 Page 0898 KY.,SW.VA.,TENN.,MISS.,N.ALA., AND N.GA. Chapter XLII.

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HDQRS. FIRST BRIG., FOURTH DIV., 14TH ARMY CORPS, September 27, 1863.

Captain SINCLAIR,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

All quiet at this point. For news from above I refer you to the dispatches of General Crook and Colonel Atkins.

I am, captain, very truly, your obedient servant,

A. O. MILLER,

Colonel, Commanding Brigade.

HEADQUARTERS CHIEF OF CAVALRY, DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Near Chattanooga, September 27, 1863.

Colonel E. M. McCOOK,

Commanding First Division Cavalry:

COLONEL: The general commanding directs me to say to you that he wishes your command kept at all times in a complete state of readiness for any sudden movement. Have three days' rations constantly on hand and also a full supply of ammunition. Get your animals shod up and everything in the best possible condition.

Keep your command concentrated as much as you can consistent with the duty assigned you.

I remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. H. SINCLAIR,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST DIVISION CAVALRY, On Road near Jasper, September 27, 1863.

[Major SINCLAIR:]

MAJOR: In compliance with orders, I moved yesterday afternoon in the direction of Bridgeport, sending the train with two regiments on the stage road, marching with one regiment on the river road. I saw no appearance of rebels on the other side, and found the troops of my command doing their duty. At Eyler's Ford and Rankin's Ferry, which are both together, 5 1/2 miles east of Jasper, there is one company. The river there is fordable; any column could cross without any trouble, and from the nature of the country on this side no obstructions can be thrown in the way. I regard this as one of the most important points on the line, and would earnestly recommend that at least a regiment of infantry and a section of artillery be immediately sent there to defend the crossing. The only way in which the crossing can be effectively obstructed is by the presence of troops.

The approaches from the other side are of such a character that they can bring artillery down without difficulty. No picket has been at Shellmound heretofore. I have ordered one squadron, Second East Tennessee, there until further orders. I have also increased the force at Eyler's Ford to a battalion, with orders to take axes and throw all the obstructions in the way possible, and in case of an attempt to cross to send couriers both ways.

If the general commanding see proper to send the force I suggest, their commanding sees proper to send the force I suggest, their commanders can gain all the necessary information from Lieutenant-Colonel Cook, Second Tennessee, at Jasper.