War of the Rebellion: Serial 052 Page 0890 KY.,SW.VA.,TENN., MISS.,N.ALA., AND N. GA. Chapter XLII.

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CORINTH, September 27, 1863.

Colonel MERSY:

A scout of two regiments left here this morning for Montezuma, where it is reported Newsom is with 1,000 men.

C. H. DYER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

CORINTH, September 27, 1863. [Received about 2.43 p.m.]

Colonel MERSY,

Pocahontas:

The following just received from Colonel Burke:

I am informed there is a large force of rebels congregating at Ruckersville. The number is said to be over 5,000. This comes from a source that seems entitled to credit.

C. H. DYER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

CAMP DAVIES, September 27, 1863. [Received about 2.44 p.m.]

Colonel MERSY,

Pocahontas:

Have you heard of any rebel force at Ruckersville or vicinity? I am informed there is a large force of rebels collecting there.

P. E. BURKE,

Colonel, Commanding.

CHATTANOOGA, September 27, 1863. [Received 4,50 a.m., 28th.]

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

I have with General Rosecrans visited the lines of defense of this place. I have seen the men vigorous, hearty, cheerful, and confident. The position is very strong already, and rapidly approaching a perfect security against assault. Nothing but a regular siege could, I think, reduce it. That would take time. The difficulties of transportation of supplies are immense. The roads are rocky and mountainous, yet trains get through without much destruction of wagons. When the river rises the bridges will go, but the river will become navigable. One steam-boat and a few flats are ready for service. Another steam-boat is nearing completion. For another the machinery is at Bridgeport. The water is too low at present for the Paint Rock, the captured steam-boat, to navigate the river, and the rebels command the channel. When the troops understood to be on their way here arrive, General Rosecrans expects to recover command of the river to Bridgeport. Supplies can then be accumulated by water. A month's hard service has much injured the wagon-trains; animals still in very fair condition, so far as I have seen them. Plenty of them here and at Nashville.