War of the Rebellion: Serial 052 Page 0879 Chapter XLII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS CHIEF OF CAVALRY, Island Ferry, September 26, 1863.

Respectfully forwarded for the information of Major-General Rosecrans.

General Crook has been ordered to relieve the Second Michigan, after which it will move this way.

ROBT. B. MITCHELL,

Brigadier-General.

[Inclosure.]

HDQRS. NINETY-SECOND ILLINOIS VOLUNTEERS, Harrison's Landing, Tenn., September 26, 1863-3 p.m.

Captain A. A. RICE, Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: All quiet along the river. Pickets opposite talking with my pickets and agreeing not to shoot. Has been a brigade of Forrest's men in Harrison this a.m., but moved apparently up the river.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

SMITH D. ATKINS,

Colonel Ninety-second Illinois Volunteers.

HEADQUARTERS CHIEF OF CAVALRY, Island Ferry, September 26, 1863.

Colonel McCOOK:

COLONEL: The general commanding directs that you draw in your pickets and get your command in readiness to march.

I am, your obedient servant,

WM. H. SINCLAIR,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS CHIEF OF CAVALRY, September 26, 1863.

[Colonel E. M. McCOOK:]

COLONEL: The general says have your transportation in readiness to go. He cannot tell whether it will go or not until he goes to headquarters. He is just starting. If you march you will take every soldier with you except Colonel Hoblitzell's regiment.

I directed you in the note this morning to draw in your pickets. Notify General Steedman that you have withdrawn the troops from the island, and, if you have other patrols out, notify either him or General Whitaker that you withdraw them this morning.

Respectfully, yours,

WM. H. SINCLAIR.

HEADQUARTERS CHIEF OF CAVALRY, DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Island Ferry, September 26, 1863.

[Colonel E. M. McCOOK:]

COLONEL: I have just received a note from the general, who is at headquarters. He says:

Order McCook to move out with his command and wagon train immediately to the point designated-i.e., to the vicinity of Bridgeport-to prevent the enemy from crossing the river, and guarding our railroad communication.