War of the Rebellion: Serial 052 Page 0846 KY.,SW.VA.,TENN.,MISS.,N.ALA., AND N.GA. Chapter XLII.

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NASHVILLE, September 25, 1863.

Colonel GODDARD,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

COLONEL: I have the honor to report that I much desire to move my five companies from Elk River to some point near Wartrace or Christiana, for the purpose of getting out timber for bridges and ties. There is now force enough at Elk River without them, and they can be of much advantage in guarding the road nearer this way, and at the same time be getting out timber and ties. By making this change, I think you will benefit the Government and it will be obliging me. I will notify you of the exact location when I move, and locate them.

WM. P. INNES,

Colonel and Military Superintendent.

CIRCULAR.] HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Chattanooga, September 25, 1863.

All wagon trains sent from this place across the river will be sent under charge of an officer [commissioned officer, if possible], who will be furnished by the corps commanders with a pass, stating the number of wagons, teamsters, guards, and attendants which compose the train. This he will bring to these headquarters for the approval of the chief quartermaster. No single wagons will be permitted to cross. If it is necessary for them to go, they will attach themselves to the train of their corps and be included in the pass. Immediate attention must be given to this matter, as orders have been given to the bridge guard to allow no wagons to cross except as herein provided. The trains of each corps will have a fixed time for crossing, to be regulated by the chief quartermaster of the department.

All trains coming this way will cross the river by the upper or old bridge; all going, by the lower or new bridge.

By command of Major-General Rosecrans:

C. GODDARD,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General.

COURIER STATION NO.7, Wash. Pryor's House, September 25, 1863-12.30 p.m.

Brigadier-General GARFIELD,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: I have examined carefully the Haley trace and find it very rough. There are four very heavy grades on the route, two of them caused by Mullen's Creek. However, the road can be made available with some labor; it is the road now used.

I am now starting back on the cut-off, and will reach Bob White's house to-night, where please send me the news or any instructions. I need not go the river road as it is same as road from Chattanooga to foot of mountain below Bob White's. I shall get all the information regarding its distance from river and points at which the enemy could use artillery; also along the road from White's to Chattanooga. A bridge must be constructed over the Sequatchie; the piers are