War of the Rebellion: Serial 052 Page 0778 KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., N. ALA. AND N. GA. Chapter XLII.

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Journal of operations of the Fourteenth Army Corps.

SEPTEMBER 22. 1863.

About 9 a.m. the enemy's advance guard fired upon our pickets, and more or less skirmishing going on throughout the entire day.

Our pickets held their ground, and by nightfall the army was sufficiently intrenched to resist an assault. The Fourteenth Army Corps was placed as follows:Negley occupied the fort immediately on the west of the La Fayette road; Reynolds in reserve and covering his right flank; Brannan in rifle-pits extending form the fort to the East Tennessee railroad, and Rousseau in reserve behind Brannan's left and connecting with the right of Crittenden's corps.

HEADQUARTERS FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

September 22, 1863. (Received 1.30 a.m.)

Brigadier-General GARFIELD:

Chief of Staff, Department Headquarters:

An intelligent contraband, belonging to Major Young, quartermaster of Cheatham's division, states that the enemy's advance is about 3 miles from here. Says he heard them say they numbered 100,000 men, made up of Bragg's and Johnston's army, Longstreet's corps, Buckner's corps, and about 10,000 State troops (not good). Bragg is in command. Generals Hood, Gregg, Smith, and Adams (all general officers) reported killed. Says the Virginia rebels say they never saw such fighting; to yell only makes the Yankees pitch in. Carne's battery, Wright's brigade, he says, was captured. Says the rebels say they are bound to go to Kentucky and Tennessee for the purpose of getting bacon, &c., They say they captured forty guns and 519 prisoners. They think some of Rosecrans' army had gone to Charleston.

GEO. E. FLYNT,

Assistant Adjutant-General .

This boy tells a simple, straightforward story, and is believed reliable.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Chattanooga, September 22, 1863-12.10 p.m.

Major General GEORGE H. THOMAS,

Commanding Fourteenth Army Corps:

GENERAL: The general commanding suggests that General Rousseau's command should make a banquette or berme on the railroad embankment for the men to stand on. Also that there should be two or three short rifle-pits at right angles to the railroad so as to flank it.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. A. GARFIELD,

Brigadier-General, Chief of Staff.