War of the Rebellion: Serial 052 Page 0777 Chapter XLII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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below here), thus leaving 5 1/2 miles unprotected. I know there is nothing in front of me this side of the river.

Bob White considers this point very unsafe, and he comes to you with this line. He can report the circumstances more minutely than I can write them. I have seen at the opposite shore a plank boat which would carry 20 men, and two canoes that would carry 4 or 5 each. I am without a guard. The courier post on the mountain is all the force near me. I shall keep this station open, weather permitting, until I get orders, but if I am to remain here I would like a guard, unless the general commanding send a force sufficient to protect the mountain.

Yours, respectfully,

H. C. JONES

Captain and Acting Signal Officer.

HIGH HILL WEST OF CHATTANOOGA,

September 22, 1863-2 p.m.

Captain MERRILL:

A dense black smoke has arisen north 50 degrees east, bout 8 miles distant.

HOPKINS.

SIGNAL STATION OVER THE RIVER,

[September 22, 1863.]

Captain MERRILL:

I seek troops on Missionary Ridge 2 miles east of Chattanooga. I think it is rebel cavalry.

FORAKER.

SEPTEMBER 22, 1863.

(Received 11 a.m.)

Statement of Colonel Harrison's scout sent in by colonel: A heavy column has been passing toward Shallow Ford road, on Tennessee River, for three hours; is still passing. Skirmishing lightly with Colonel Harrison's forces.

HENRY C. TINNEY.

Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Chattanooga, September 22, 1863-4.15 p.m.

Major General GEORGE H. THOMAS:

The general commanding directs that all the topographical engineers in your command report immediately to Captain W. E. Merrill, at these headquarters.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. GODDARD,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General.

(Copy to Major-Generals Crittenden, McCook, and Granger, and Brigadier-General Mitchell.)