War of the Rebellion: Serial 052 Page 0729 Chapter XLII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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a scout, one from Bellefont, the other from Tantalon, through the mountains; report having neither seen nor heard anything of guerrilla parties. All quiet along the lines.

JAS. D. MORGAN,

Brigadier-General.

SHELBYVILLE,

September 18, 1863-10.10 a.m.

General GORDON GRANGER:

SIR: There are a large number of guerrillas and rebel cavalry lurking around in Giles, Lincoln, and Marshall Counties. Their intention is to concentrate and attack this post. They are represented to be about 1,000 strong, and I have reliable information that their intention is to organize a regiment about 16 miles from me on Saturday, and also to have a barbecue. If I could be permitted to concentrate my forces (some of whom are now at Decherd, Tullahoma, Normandy, &c.), I can go down and pitch into them and rout them, and perhaps kill or make some important captures if I can get them concentrated. I can guard the road well from this to Decherd, and drive them from the State entirely.

Respectfully,

ROBERT GALBRAITH,

Commanding Post.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Crawfish Spring, September 18, 1863-10.45 a.m.

Brigadier-General WAGNER:

The general commanding directs that you send forward all the members of the Twenty-first Army Corps not belonging to your brigade. Put the men of the Fourteenth and Twentieth Army Corps on fatigue duty till we can confer with their corps commanders. Report where these men came from, and how it happens they are without arms.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. A. GARFIELD,

Brigadier-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS,

Chattanooga, Tenn., September 18, 1863.

General J. A. GARFIELD:

Yours of this date has been received. The dispatch for General Burnside forwarded. Have sent Captain Moreau up in the direction of the general's advance to communicate with it, and also to scout the country along the river and as far out as Cleveland. Nothing of any interest to-day.

A part of the wagons that came in last night were loaded with forage instead of rations. By whose order I do not know, but certainly we should have food for the men before we transport forage, as there is plenty in the country.

Your obedient servant,

G. D. WAGNER,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.