War of the Rebellion: Serial 052 Page 0718 KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., N. ALA., AND N. GA. Chapter XLII.

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hope. We have five engines and some twenty-odd cars here on this road. We are completing a steam-boat at Kingston which can carry supplies from Bridgeport to this place. We brought with us a herd of near 2,000 beef-cattle, which are not yet exhausted, and a herd of 2,000 which I ordered before leaving Kentucky ought to be here in a few days. Some supply trains are also now on the road. I brought with me 5,000 stand of rifled-muskets, with equipments and ammunition, which are now being issued to troops that are organizing here. I think we will have no difficulty in organizing from 5,000 to 10,000 troops, and therefore beg that 5,000 stand of Springfield rifles be placed at my disposal in Cincinnati, with equipments and plenty of ammunition. The men in this country are all good marksmen and are devotedly loyal.

Respectfully,

A. E. BRUNSIDE,

Major-General, Commanding.

KNOXVILLE, TENN., September 17, 1863.

(Via Cumberland Gap, 18th. Received 10.40 a.m., 19th.)

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

Your dispatches of 13th and 14th received. Orders to go below will be obeyed as soon as possible. I go to Greeneville to-night. Dispositions for attacking the enemy at Jonesborough made. I will lose no time in doing as your order. No direct telegraphic communication as yet. Hope to get it to-morrow.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, D. C., September 17, 1863-10.40 a.m.

Adjutant-General ANDERSON,

Cincinnati, Ohio:

Have the Eleventh Kentucky Regiment properly armed and sent forward without delay.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

GENERAL FIELD ORDERS,

HDQRS. ARMY OF THE OHIO,

Numbers 13

September 17, 1863.

As it is the mission of this army to rescue East Tennessee from rebel despotism, so it is also its duty to see that within its lines law and order are enforced. No advantage must be taken of its presence to avenge private wrongs or to gratify a personal malice, and it must be distinctly understood by all, both citizens and soldiers, that any unauthorized injuries inflicted by any on either person or property will be promptly punished with the utmost rigor of military law. No levies on property for the public service will be made, except by the proper authority, and in no case will any person, no matter how great may be his criminality, be left without the means of subsistence. Offenses or depredations should be at once reported to the