War of the Rebellion: Serial 052 Page 0614 KY.,SW. VA.,TENN.,MISS.,N. ALA.,AND N. GA. Chapter XLII

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will show you the road to Rossville. It will not be necessary for your troops to come through town, as you can save a wide detour by taking a direct road from the foot of the mountain. I have directed Colonel McCook to move out to Rossville early to-morrow morning; his wagons can follow him when they get over the mountain.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. GODDARD,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Chattanooga, September 13, 1863-11.30 p. m.

Major General GORDON GRANGER:

Crittenden is probably engaged with the enemy in force at or near Gordon's Mills, musketry and artillery being heard in that direction from signal station at Rossville. Pass your troops through by forced march as rapidly as possible.

By order of Major-General Rosecrans:

C. GODDARD,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Chattanooga, September 13, 1863.

Colonel DAN. McCOOK:

Since seeing you this evening, it has occurred to me that it will delay your march too much to wait for your wagons, as we do not know what the night may bring forth on General Crittenden's front.

You will, therefore, move your command early to-morrow morning to Rossville, take a good position there, cover the La Fayette road and the one to Ringgold; keep a good watch on your left flank. I have informed General Granger of these orders, and he will send your wagons out as soon as they can be gotten over the mountain.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. GODDARD,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General.

SHELBYVILLE, September 13, 1863.

Major-General ROSECRANS,

Commanding Army of the Cumberland:

DEAR SIR: I have been here since your order placing me here to conduct the scouts from this place, which has been numerous, and has endeavored to discharge my duty, which you will see from the reports. I am in 11 miles of home, and have not spent four hours there. We have and insufficient number of troops here-a small battalion commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Galbraith. There is between 400 and 500 guerrillas between this and Lawrenceburg, and is threatening this place; but we will hold it or be left on the field dead. General, I wish permission of you to have some cars about 10th of October to move my family to Indiana, and then return to my post. Give me this, and accommodate

W. R. SMITH.