War of the Rebellion: Serial 052 Page 0560 Chapter XIII. KY.,SW.VA.,TENN.,MISS.,N.ALA.,AND N.GA.

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The above is not very clear as to the strength of the enemy. Have ordered Hatch to attack, break up, and rout Richardson's and Chalmers'forces if he is strong enough. If not, I will send more. I have out to-day a strong cavalry party to drive Roddey's pickets beyond Bear Creek. They have been troublesome of late. I have also a party out north, toward Jackson and Lexington, where the rebel bands are said to be surrounding Harrison.

E. A. CARR,

Brigadier-General.

CORINTH, September 12, 1863.

(Received 13th.)

Major-General HURLBUT, Memphis:

Flag of truce from Roddey is at lines of Glendale. It brings Lieutenant Welton, Federal, wounded, proposing to exchange for Lieutenant Collingham [?], Confederate, also wounded. Lieutenant Collingham was captured 6th July last, dangerously wounded. He was paroled by your direction on 1st September, to report to your headquarters in thirty days.

It also brings several wounded men to exchange for men of the Confederate army. I have some 12 prisoners of war now in confinement. Can I make the exchange? The officer in charge of flag admits that Chattanooga is taken. These wounded men brought by the flag are paroled, and the officer is instructed to deliver them in case we have none to exchange. Are the paroles valid given by Roddey?

E. A. CARR,

Brigadier-General.

CORINTH, September 12, 1863.

Major-General HURLBUT, Memphis:

Colonel Hatch did not do as much as I expected, though perhaps he thinks he fulfilled the strict letter of my order. As soon as the cavalry can start again, say on the 15th, I propose to send 2,000, supported by 2,000 or 3,000 infantry, all under General Sweeny, with ten days' light rations, to drive the enemy into Grenada and Okolona. At the same time I propose to send all the cavalry I can spare from here, by way of Ripley, to Pontotoc. I think the infantry can stand it, and it is the only way I can see to get rid of these continual alarms. Even then, if they run, they will come back as soon as our troops return. I think that by keeping his cavalry well spread out at first-say along a front of 40 miles-Sweeny can drive them to a head if they mean to fight. If they run, the infantry will not need to march so far.

E. A. CARR,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

CORINTH, September 12, 1863.

Colonel BINMORE:

If General Sweeny is in town, I want him to come on this morning's train and take command at La Grange, so that he can take