War of the Rebellion: Serial 052 Page 0523 Chapter XIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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CUMBERLAND GAP, September 10, 1863.

(Received 8.10 p. m.)

His Excellency A. LINCOLN,

President of the United States:

You will remember that I some time ago told you that I wished to retire to private life. The rebellion now seems pretty well checked, and the work I am doing can no doubt be as well, or better, performed by some one else, se that I can conscientiously ask to be allowed to resign, if you think the good of the service will permit. I shall be here tomorrow, and will be glad to get an answer. I look upon East Tennessee as one of the most loyal sections of the United States.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS TWENTY-FIRST ARMY CORPS,

Chattanooga, September 10, 1863-2 a. m.

Major General AMBROSE E. BURNSIDE,

Commanding Department of the Ohio, Tennessee River:

SIR: I am directed by the general commanding the Department of the Cumberland to inform you that I am in full possession of this place, having entered it yesterday at 12 m., without resistance. The enemy has retreated in the direction of Rome, Ga., the last of his force (cavalry) having left a few hours before my arrival. At daylight I make a rapid pursuit with my corps, and hope that he will be intercepted by the center and right, the latter of which was at Rome. The general commanding the department requests that you move down your cavalry and occupy the country recently covered by Colonel Minty, who will report particulars to you, and who has been ordered to cross the river.

T. L. CRITTENDEN,

Major-General, Commanding.

MOUNT VERNON, KY.,

September 10, 1863.

General POTTER:

The command will arrive here to-day. Will make about 13 miles a day. Cannot make more; roads very bad.

E. FERRERO,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS NINTH ARMY CORPS,

Lexington, Ky., September 10, 1863.

Colonel S. G. GRIFFIN,

Commanding Second Division, Ninth Army Corps:

COLONEL: You will please to get your division ready and move on as soon as possible from Crab Orchard. You should carry fifteen days' light rations (bread, coffee, sugar, and salt), besides as much as the men can carry in haversacks. Drive all the beef you want, with a surplus so that in case of delay you can reduce the other rations. You will have to depend on the country for long forage.