War of the Rebellion: Serial 052 Page 0519 Chapter XIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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Information received to-night renders it quite certain that Buckner and Walker staid at Graysville night before last, their commands having gone in the direction of La Fayette before. It is my opinion there are no rebel troops to our left except some cavalry; deserters from Buckner confirm this. I am also confident in the belief that all the forces are moving toward Rome for concentration. Cavalry parties are on our front and right flank; have been exchanging shots with our pickets all evening. About 50 reached our rear from the right and fired upon the passing train. Orders have been issued for the resumption of the march at 6 o'clock tomorrow morning.

I am, very respectfully,

JOHN M. PALMER,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES,

Opposite Friar's Island, September 10, 1863-10 a. m.

Major General J. M. PALMER,

Comdg. Second Division, Twenty-first Army Corps:

My command is across and will speedily march in the direction of Ringgold. In case you should pass there prior to my arrival, I will be obliged to you if you cause to be left there for me (of the five days' rations I am informed is on your train) coffee, sugar, salt, and salt meat. I have in my wagons now some eight or ten days' of bread, and could not transport more if it were left for me.

Very truly,

W. B. HAZEN,

Brigadier-General.

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS TWENTY-FIRST ARMY CORPS,

Chattanooga, September 10, 1863.

Respectfully forwarded.

Under date of this 10 a. m., General Hazen further states "Wildner's forces and my own are across the river, and will move on in direction of Ringgold in a few moments."

By order of Major-General Crittenden:

P. P. OLDERSHAW,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES,

Opposite Friar's Island, September 10, 1863-10 a. m.

OFFICER COMMANDING U. S. FORCES,

Chattanooga:

Wilder's forces and my own are across the river, and will move on in the direction of Ringgold in a few moments. When General Van Cleve left Pikeville he reported to me that he had left 500 boxes hard bread there, and requested me to take care of it. The best I could do was to impress a bull train, which I did, sending it under a competent officer with orders to run it down to Therman, in the Sequatchie Valley. It is time for him to be at that place now. I have had no report from him; but I would suggest that the quartermaster of Chattanooga be directed to care for this property, requiring