War of the Rebellion: Serial 052 Page 0511 Chapter XIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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tomorrow to support Reynolds. Reynolds and Brannan will move by the road from Stevens' to Catlett's Gap.

By this arrangement I hope to drive the enemy beyond Pigeon Ridge by tomorrow night. But one or two divisions of Crittenden's corps, moving on the road from Chattanooga to La Fayette, would very materially aid the advance of my corps. I very much regret not having Wilder's brigade, as I believe if I had had it I could have seized Dug and Catlett's Gaps before the enemy could have reached those places. The want of cavalry has prevented me from communicating with General McCook also. I shall move my headquarters across the mountain tomorrow with the troops.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. H. THOMAS,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Chattanooga, September 10, 1863-9.45 p. m.

Major-General THOMAS,

Commanding Fourteenth Army Corps:

The general commanding directs me to say that General Negley's dispatch forwarded by you at 10 a. m. is received. He is disappointed to learn from it that his forces move tomorrow morning instead of having moved this morning, as they should have done, this delay imperiling both extremes of the army. Your movement on La Fayette should be made with the utmost promptness. You ought not to encumber yourself with your main supply train. A brigade or two will be sufficient to protect it. Your advance ought to have threatened La Fayette yesterday evening.

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. P. DROUILLARD,

Captain and Aide-de-Camp.

HDQRS. THIRD BRIG., FOURTH DIV., 14TH ARMY CORPS,

Lookout Creek, Ga., September 10, 1863.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL,

Third Division, Fourteenth Army Corps:

SIR: The Second Brigade, Fourth Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, encamped at the foot of the mountain this evening. This brigade 4 miles behind them at Lookout Creek. The division ordnance and supply train and the army corps headquarters train are between the two brigades.

This brigade moves at 6.30 a. m. tomorrow, but will no doubt be detained at the foot of the mountain by the preceding brigades and trains. I send this information for your guidance as to time of march tomorrow.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. B. CURTIS,

Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.