War of the Rebellion: Serial 052 Page 0508 Chapter XIII. KY.,SW.VA.,TENN.,MISS.,N.ALA.,AND N.GA.

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Chattanooga, and that his headquarters will be either there or near head of Lookout Creek. He has directed that courier line of communication be kept up with Whiteside's, from which point he will connect either by telegraph or courier. He suggests that you have a staff officer see the officer in charge of courier line that communication may not be interrupted with department headquarters.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

FRANK S. BOND,

Major and Aide-de-Camp.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Chattanooga, September 10, 1863.

Major-General THOMAS,

Commanding Fourteenth Army Corps:

In addition to the accompanying dispatch, the general commanding further directs that you open direct communication with General McCook, and take care to hurt the enemy as much as possible. It is important to know whether he retreats on Rome or Cedar Bluff. If the enemy has passed La Fayette toward Rome he will threaten McCook; if he has not passed this point, he will endanger Crittenden. Much depends on the promptitude of your movements.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. P. DROUILLARD,

Captain and Aide-de-Camp.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

September 10, 1863.

Major-General THOMAS,

Commanding Fourteenth Army Corps:

We received a dispatch from Burnside to-day, informing us that his operations for the liberation of East Tennessee have resulted in the capture of 3 locomotives and 20 cars; also 2,000 prisoners and 14 pieces of artillery at Cumberland Gap. They surrendered unconditionally.

Very respectfully,

J. P. DROUILLARD,

Captain and Aide-de-Camp.

[SEPTEMBER 10, 1863.-For abstract from tri-monthly returns of the Army of the Cumberland, see Part I, p. 169.]

HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Foot of Mountain, September 10, 1863.

Lieutenant Colonel GEORGE E. FLYNT,

Assistant Adjutant-General and Chief of Staff:

COLONEL: General Baird reached this point a little after sunrise this morning and finds more detention than he expected; some perhaps half, of the train of the Second Brigade being on the mountain,