War of the Rebellion: Serial 052 Page 0439 Chapter XLII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

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HDQRS. CAVALRY DIVISION, SIXTEENTH ARMY CORPS, Memphis, Tenn., September 8, 1863.

Colonel EDWARD HATCH,

Comdg. Third Brigade Cavalry, Germantown, Tenn.:

COLONEL: You will hold yourself and your command in readiness to move upon an expedition by order of Brigadier General E. A. Carr, the object of which is self forth in the copy of his instructions from Major General S. A. Hurlbut, which is inclosed herewith. i notify the brigades at Corinth and La Grange by telegraph.

By order of Brigadier-General Grierson, commanding Cavalry Division, Sixteenth Army Corps:

[J. K. CATLIN,]

Lieutenant and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS SIXTEENTH ARMY CORPS, September 8, 1863.

Brig. General B. H. GRIERSON,

Commanding Cavalry Division:

GENERAL: I inclose you copy of my letter of instructions to General E. A. Carr. I regret that your knee prevents you taking charge of this movement; but, as it is, you will issue the order at once for the cavalry to obey the orders of Brigadier E. A. Carr. I have not heard from Hatch, nor do I precisely know where he is.

Yours,truly,

S. A. HURLBUT,

Major-General.

[Sub-inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS SIXTEENTH ARMY CORPS, Memphis, Tenn., September 8, 1863.

Brigadier General E. A. CARR,

Corinth, Miss.:

GENERAL: You will organize as soon as practicable an expeditionary corps and move upon the force now at Baldwyn and Okolona. I think two brigades of cavalry and a battery (outside of the howitzers), supported by mounted infantry, would be sufficient; of this, however, you will judge on consultation with Colonel Hatch, who is very well posted on that region of country. General Grierson is disabled; Colonel Hatch will therefore command the cavalry and the expedition, unless you shall prefer to take charge yourself. We have now a supply of both artillery and cavalry horses here, and will supply your force. Men should go light on this dash, taking nothing but provisions and ammunition.

The enemy should be driven in and punished sharply, and if you find it practicable to successfully attack Columbus and break up the conscript camp there, it should be done by all means. You can easily take 3,500 good mounted men and still leave enough for picket duty. The cavalry will be ordered to hold themselves subject to your order, as a day or two will be required to prepare and select your troops. I am in hopes we will have a rain first.

Let me know when you will be ready to start, and I will move a regiment of infantry and battalion of cavalry straight down on Panola to attract their attention in this direction.