War of the Rebellion: Serial 052 Page 0417 Chapter XLII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

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as my rations in haversack will be giving out to-morrow, and I must make provision to replenish them. The officers are already getting very short, as I did not deem it prudent to bring forward with me the division ambulance train and the light baggage train we arranged at Shellmound. I left it yesterday to join the main train with you. Nor do I yet deem it prudent to have it here, but it would be so if General Palmer's force were moved up to cover my rear.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

TH. J. WOOD,

Brigadier-General of Volunteers, Commanding.

[Inclosure No. 2.]

SEPTEMBER 7, 1863-6.30 p.m.

Captain P. P. OLDERSHAW,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: I have just received a message from Colonel Harker, through one of his staff officers, saying he was on his way back opened on by the enemy's artillery on the point of Lookout Mountain, from three positions on the mountain side. Fortunately he had but one casualty, 1 man being killed by the bursting of a shell. More full report will be sent when Colonel Harker reports to men in person.

Respectfully,&c.,

TH. J. WOOD,

Brigadier-General of Volunteers, Commanding.

[Inclosure No. 3.]

WHITESIDE'S, September 7, 1863.

Captain OLDERSHAW:

No communication with Bridgeport. No operator here; all gone to Trenton with General Wood's division. Have field telegraph train here, and am awaiting orders to put it up to your headquarters.

Very respectfully,

SAM. F. REBER,

Lieutenant and Acting Signal Officer, in Charge.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Trenton, Ga., September 7, 1863.

Major-General CRITTENDEN,

Commanding Twenty-first Army Corps:

Your dispatch of 9.30 p.m., inclosing General Wood's report of Colonel Harker's reconnaissance, is received. The general commanding directs you to require from General Wood a more definite report of the reconnaissance. The report does not tell us where he found the enemy, or in what force or how near to Chattanooga he pushed the reconnaissance. It is important that the general commanding should know the position, strength, and probable intention of the enemy in that direction.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. A. GARFIELD,

Brigadier-General, Chief of Staff.

27 R R-VOL XXX, PT III