War of the Rebellion: Serial 052 Page 0399 Chapter XLII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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across the mountains. You will of course be prepared to obstruct such roads as will admit of it, in case of failure to hold them without. The several roads from Pikeville leading to McMinnville can probably be obstructed at the mountain so as to cause a delay of a day or so, or a detour toward Sparta, which would amount to the same thing. Robinson's road, leaving the Sequatchie several miles below Pikeville, is understood to be the only practicable road across the mountain toward McMinnville between Pikeville and Dunlap. These roads the general desires you to be prepared to obstruct in advance of your arrival in the Sequatchie, should you be forced across the mountain and ordered down the Sequatchie Valley.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. L. KIMBERLY,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES, LEFT FLANK,

Poe's Tavern, September 6, 1863.

Colonel MINTY,

Commanding First Brigade, Second Cavalry Division:

COLONEL: General Hazen directs that you picket the river at the fording places in your front as far up as Blythe's Ferry. For the rest patrols will be sufficient. The force kept at the fords need only be sufficient for observation of the crossings and their immediate vicinity.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, &c.,

R. L. KIMBERLY,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, September 6, 1863- 6 p.m.

Honorable SECRETARY OF WAR,

Bedford, Pa.:

Burnside has Kingston and Knoxville, and drove the enemy across the river at Loudon, the enemy destroying the bridge there; captured some stores and one or two trains; very little fighting; few wounded, and none killed. No other news of consequence.

A. LINCOLN.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, September 6, 1863-11 a.m.

Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON,

Bedford Springs, Pa.:

General Burnside reports the occupation by his forces of Loudon Bridge, Kingston, and Knoxville, E. Tenn., and the capture a new steam-boat nearly finished at Kingston, two locomotives and a number of cars at Knoxville, together with a very considerable amount of army stores at various points. There was a brisk skirmish at Loudon Bridge, where the enemy was strongly posted, but no serious