War of the Rebellion: Serial 052 Page 0353 Chapter XLII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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NASHVILLE, TENN., September 4, 1863.

Colonel W. P. BOONE,

Columbia:

You will mount the remainder of the Twenty-eight Kentucky. Procure horses from disloyal residents, give vouchers in the usual form, to be paid as the Government may hereafter direct.

By command of Major-General Granger:

W. C. RUSSELL,

Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Stevenson, Ala., September 4, 1863.

Colonel W. P. INNES,

Nashville, Tenn.:

The general commanding directs that Colonel Thompson's regiment of colored troops must be left together as much as possible, and that it never be divided so that less than one-third the regiment shall be by itself until he has had sufficient time to thoroughly organize.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. GODDARD,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY,

Winston's, September 4, 1863-11 a.m.

General J. A. GARFIELD,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: General Crook's camp is at this point, and has possession of Winn's Gap. Colonel McCook has gone on to Rawlingsville. Four miles this side of Rawlingsville a road crosses the mountain, but it is a bad road. The crossing here is also bad; no depression in the mountain. Between this and Easley's are traces every 4 or 5 miles which cavalry may cross, single file.

In Broomtown Valley Wheeler's forces have been scattered, but from all I can learn, Martin's force has moved toward Chattanooga.

I have not yet heard from Colonel McCook.

Respectfully,

D. S. STANLEY,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS CHIEF OF CAVALRY,

Camp near Winston's, September 4, 1863-7.45 p.m.

General J. A. GARFIELD,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: I have but little to add since my dispatch of this morning. McCook scouted beyond Rawlingsville. No enemy, expecting home guards, have been in this country.

I will send a force to Broomtown Valley to-morrow. This crossing of the mountain is said to be the best; it is quite bad; about the

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