War of the Rebellion: Serial 052 Page 0301 Chapter XLII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

river to-morrow. If you can move out to-morrow on the Trenton road, then day after you can move your command forward for Trenton.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. E. FLYNT,

Assistant Adjutant-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Bolivar Springs, September 2, 1863.

Major-General REYNOLDS,

Commanding Fourth Division:

GENERAL: Your dispatch received. Disposition of troops, &c., are approved by the general commanding. Make your arrangements for an early advance on Trenton from the point where you now are.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. E. FLYNT,

Assistant Adjutant-General and Chief of Staff.

HDQRS. FIRST BRIG., FOURTH DIV., 14TH ARMY CORPS,

In front of Chattanooga, September 2, 1863.

Lieutenant Colonel C. GODDARD,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

COLONEL: I have the honor to report that large clouds of dust were to be seen yesterday afternoon in the direction of Tyner's Station and Ringgold. At sunset there was no abatement of the dust, and at night the ascending smoke gave evidence of the encampment of troops in that vicinity. All I can see or hear is confirmatory of the dispatch of Colonel Funkhouser, given below:

HEADQUARTERS DETACHMENTS FIRST BRIGADE,

September 2, 1863.

COLONEL: I have reliable information up as far as Colonel Minty's. Everything seems to indicate that the enemy are active and stirring. There seems to be no attempt at anything like crossing. All along the line last night was a continual bustle and stir; troops moving all night. Wagons could be heard passing all the ferries; could get no reliable information as to which way the wagons were moving. Captain Flood, at Harrison, thought the movement was in the direction of Chattanooga. The enemy seem to be actively at work on the defenses along the entire line. This morning drums could be heard beating time and moving in the direction of Chattanooga. All the indications seem to confirm the movement to be in that direction. They showed a much stronger front yesterday than at any time for several days. This may be accounted for in this way. It is evident to me from all the information that I can get that they are bringing the forces from up about Kingston and this side. The raid the enemy was expected to make on yesterday did not take place. All my officers in charge of picket posts make the report that continued chopping or pounding could be heard all last night, as if they were repairing wagons, making boats or some such thing. I will continue to report any and all information that I deem at all needful or interesting to you.

I am, colonel, yours to command,

JOHN J. FUNKHOUSER,

Colonel, Commanding.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, yours to command,

J. T. WILDER,

Colonel, Commanding Brigade.