War of the Rebellion: Serial 052 Page 0209 Chapter XLII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.- UNION.

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the best for a train, that or the one from Columbia. Then empty as many wagons as you can be reloading, and send the empty ones under a suitable, but not too large, cavalry guard to either Lebanon or Cave City for supplies, to return as soon as possible. Retain your best teams. If you find the route via Monticello and somerset to Crab Orchard to be better than either of the others, you can send that way. There is an advantage in going by Monticello, because it is an interior line and will require a smaller escort. Has Colonel Graham arrived? if so, he can go anywhere in the vicinity of Jamestown, not to exceed 10 or 12 miles, when he can have the chance to get forage.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. L. HARTSUFF,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS TWENTY-THIRD ARMY CORPS,

Chitwood's, Tenn., August 28, 1863.

Brig. General M. S. HASCALL,

Comdg. Third Division, Twenty-third Army Corps:

The general directs me to say that the general supply train, in charge of Captain Lunt, will not be able to start as early in the morning as was anticipated, and will not, in consequence, perhaps, he able to reach our camp to-morrow night. Also that the cavalry guard now with it is too small. He wishes, therefore, that you detail an infantry regiment from your command to wait on the ground they now occupy until the train reaches here to-morrow morning, when the commanding officer of the regiment will report to Colonel Wolford, commanding the cavalry guard of the train, to proceed with the train as additional guard for it to Montgomery.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. B. DRAKE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS TWENTY-THIRD ARMY CROPS,

Chitwood's, Tenn., August 28, 1863.

Colonel J. W. FOSTER,

Commanding Second Brigade, Fourth Division:

Move with your whole division to-morrow morning in the direction of Montgomery, reaching that place the same night. General Carter, With the other brigades of his division, will be at Montgomery when, or soon after, you arrive. Report to him as soon as possible after your arrival if he is there; if not, send back on the Huntsville road and notify him of your arrival and the disposition of your command. One brigade will probably pass before you and be on the road toward Kingston. General Carter will not be with it. General White will start also to-morrow morning. After reaching 15 or 20 miles from Jamestown look out for a place for the infantry to encamp on, and send back word to General White. Keep your column well closed and in hand. The Eleventh and Twelfth Kentucky Cavalry will report to General White for orders.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. L. HARTSUFF,

Major-General, Commanding.