War of the Rebellion: Serial 052 Page 0207 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION. Chapter XLII.

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CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.- UNION.

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS SECOND CAVALRY DIVISION,

Near Bridgeport, August 28, 1863.

Respectfully forwarded.

No orders have been given from these headquarters to prevent foraging, but, on the contrary, the division quartermaster was instructed to obtain forage, and give the instructions to the brigade quartermasters. The division train has been employed since our arrival here hauling stores from Stevenson.

GEORGE CROOK,

Brigadier-General.

LOUISVILLE, KY.,

August 28, 1863.

General POTTER:

If you can leave the Seventy-first Indiana in Kentucky, I will be obliged if you will order it to Mount Sterling, with orders to report to me from that place.

J. T. BOYLE,

Brigadier-General.

LONDON, KY., August 28, 1863.

Major-General PARKE,or

Captain BOWEN,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

Camped now 3 miles north of London. Must go 6 miles south of London to Laurel Bridge for water. None between these two points. Will be out of rations and forage this evening.

JNO. F. DE COURCY,

Colonel, Commanding.

LONDON, KY., August 28, 1863.

Major-General PARKE, or

Captain BOWEN:

In conversation with General Burnside he at my request appeared to agree to the necessity of running the wire by the old road to Flat Lick. I should not have asked for this, neither should I have been so anxious about the cavalry coming up and the large supply trains, had I not supposed that I was to advance to the gap, and even farther than that point, but I shall wait your further orders. Please inform me when your advance begins. The road between Mount Vernon and 4 miles north of this is very hilly and fearfully bad; will impede operations very much.

JNO. F. DE COURCY,

Colonel, Commanding Brigade.

3 MILES NORTH OF LONDON, KY.,

August 28, 1863.

Major-General PARKE, or

Assistant Adjutant-General:

General Burnside gave me verbal orders and I distinctly understood That I was to move on to the Cumberland Gap as quickly as