War of the Rebellion: Serial 052 Page 0131 Chapter XIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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here and there being concentrated at various points to march upon us, and soon thereafter receive information directly to the contrary. My judgment is that there is no considerable force concentrated in this section but occasional bands of guerrillas and conscripting parties, whose numbers are quite small.

Colonel Waring, upon his departure, did not give me instructions concerning my duties at this post; consequently, I am at a loss to know what course to pursue, except to protect my camp from surprise, and be ready for action at any moment. I would be pleased to hear from you, and receive from you such instructions as the general may see proper to give, and endeavor to the best of my abilities to obey them. If you have leisure would be much pleased to have a visit from the general and yourself, and receive such instructions from you in reference to my camp and my future operations as you deem proper.

Respectfully submitted.

CHAS. H. FOX,

Colonel 101st Regt. Illinois Vol. Infantry, Commdg. Brigade.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Stevenson, August 23, 1863-11 p. m.

(Received 7 p. m., 24th.)

Major-General HALLECK,

Washington, D. C.:

Corps remain same. Crittenden's advance occupies Poe's Tavern and a point 6 miles from Chattanooga. Wilder's report received to-day confirms last night's report. He says he sunk one of the steamboats, damaged the other one; [our] loss 1 wounded, 4 horses killed. Rebels hold the fords and ferries from Washington down to Shellmound, which we seized last night. Means of crossing getting ready. Wilder reports [that he] saw enemy take away 9 engines in one train, 2 hauling the rest; thinks they are evacuating Chattanooga. I think they are a little confused.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

NASHVILLE, August 23, 1863-11.30 a. m.

General ROSECRANS:

Arms for cavalry are needed. The ordnance officers refuse to furnish them without an order from you or the Secretary of War. Will General Rosecrans please give such order by telegraph, as we are trying to equip the men as fast as possible.

ANDREW JOHNSON,

Military Governor.

ORDNANCE OFFICE,

Washington, August 23, 1863.

General W. S. ROSECRANS,

Stevenson, Ala.:

Telegram received. Four thousand sets of horse equipments will be forwarded to the ordnance depot Nashville, as fast as possible.

J. W. RIPLEY,

Brigadier-General, Chief of Ordnance.