War of the Rebellion: Serial 052 Page 0122 Chapter XIII. KY.,SW.VA.,TENN.,MISS.,N.ALA.,AND N.GA.

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POE'S TAVERN, TENN.,

August 22, 1863.

Colonel FUNKHOUSER,

Commanding Cavalry at Harrison's Landing:

General Palmer has gone to Dunlap. I can see no harm in operating moderately upon the enemy this morning. I would not waste a great amount of ammunition, as you cannot expect to effect much with artillery, with a broad stream between you and the enemy that will prevent you from faking advantage of what you might otherwise gain.

W. B. HAZEN,

Brigadier-General.

POE'S TAVERN,

August 22, 1863-5 p. m.

Captain J. R. MUHLEMAN,

Assistant Adjutant-General, &c.:

I inclose two dispatches and a note to Lieutenant Chilton, acting assistant commissary of subsistence. There is nothing new to report. I have taken steps to get men over the river on the railroad to-night, and hope to get information of value. Colonel Funkhouser has returned to this place. I had a force at Igou's Landing last evening. It is defended by one Alabama regiment. I have one small mill making flour to-day, and will have two tomorrow. I have got some 20 beeves to-day.

Respectfully,

W. B. HAZEN,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST BRIGADE, FOURTH DIVISION,

Opposite Chattanooga, August 22, 1863.

(Via Tracy City, 3 a. m., 23rd.)

General GARFIELD:

I have the honor to report that the forces under my command reached the east foot of Walden's Ridge late in the evening of August 20. The next morning I sent Colonel Funkhouser, with two regiments and two rifled guns, to Harrison's Landing. He reports a brigade of infantry guarding the river, with four pieces of artillery and three hills fortified and rifle-pits for protection. The ford at Friar's Island, at the mouth of Chickamauga, is about 4 1/2 feet deep and rapid. I went with the balance of corps, three regiments and four pieces of artillery, to Chattanooga. We came within 50 yards of capturing a horse ferry-boat plying across the river. When we got in position on the river hills they had but three small pieces of artillery in position. Two steam-boats were lying at the landing, the largest of which we sank with shells before steam could be raised on it. The other, a small tow-boat, is, I think, disabled. A pontoon-bridge of forty-seven boats was lying stretched up the river, ready to swing across the stream. An attempt was made to remove it, which was prevented by a line of sharpshooters on the river bank. The river is about 600 yards wide. The town is pretty well fortified.