War of the Rebellion: Serial 052 Page 0110 Chapter XIII. KY.,SW.VA.,TENN.,MISS.,N.ALA.,AND N.GA.

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Chattanooga last evening. Say that it is stared that Johnston and 25,000 men have re-enforced Bragg;also a rumor that Johnston,in person,arrived last night at Chattanooga. Movements this day*from Chattanooga by Clebrune's division,show a design of contesting our passage this way. Corps in position as yesterday.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Stevenson, August 22, 1863.

[General HALLECK:]

MY DEAR GENERAL: Your letter of the 10th came yesterday. The impression at the War Office that I do not "draw straight in the traces" is very unjust to me. I am not the man to be petting myself and my own ideas,nor do I pique myself on trying to act independently of orders. I am profoundly convinced of the necessity and urgency of this army doing its full share of work.

But,as I have so often stated,our success here depends upon an adequate cavalry force,to combat that of the enemy,and kept up our line of communications. I could not obtain horses enough to mount the men I actually had,hence my delay in moving.

Again,after the expulsion of the rebels from Middle Tennessee, my only delays were those necessary to insure our being able to cross the mountains and maintain ourselves on this side on the mountains, which can only I have give these matters my careful attention,and had the counsels of my best officers. The concept for our opinions,apparent from the War Department,aries from a want of knowledge of the circumstances. But you know what it is to advance with a great army,even over 25 miles of miry barrens;but when it comes to 30 miles of barrens,70 miles of mountains,and two small rivers,and,finally,the great Tennesse-as broad here as at Pittsburgh Landing-you know the magnitude of the work. I therefore expect consideration from th general-in-chief. I ask it for the brave, true,and earnest officers of this command. But,general,the course of the War Department toward of these officers'opinipons,and the contemptuous silence with which our success was treated,has produced a feeling that the Secretary is unjust. As for myself, I am quite sure you,even you,wholly misunderstand me. You take my remonstrances and importunities for complains. I know that from your dispatches last autumn.

In urging the Government to send us good cavalry arms and horses, I was only pressing that which touched its interest most nearly. Let it not be overlooked that we lost the corn and all the resources of Middle Tennessee,consumed by the rebels,for want of an adequate mounted force.

Do not fail to seize and work of this idea,that with an adequate mounted force and infantry equal to theirs,we can up off their supplies and foraging parties,and starve them out the country.

Very truly,yours,

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

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* In the copy as received by General Halleck this word is way.

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