War of the Rebellion: Serial 052 Page 0091 Chapter XLII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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we started early, or we should not have reached here to-day. The march has been an easy one. Wilder will not reach his destination till morning. He failed by not starting at 4 instead of 6 this morning. General Palmer will stay at Poe's to-night. The hill is bad on the south side, and the artillery will be left on top. We found a picket of the enemy at that point, and gobbled a portion of it.

Respectfully,

W. B. HAZEN,

Brigadier-General.

HDQRS. SECOND DIV., TWENTY-FIRST ARMY CORPS,

Dunlap, August 20, 1863-10.10 p.m.

(Received 11 p.m.)

[General HAZEN:]

GENERAL: I am instructed by General Palmer to keep open communication with you, and send forward a sergeant and 4 men to let you know that Colonel Grose has arrived and that the transportation is nearly all safely down the mountain. Let me know where you are, and the time you write. Where is General Palmer, and how do you get on generally?

Yours, truly,

CHARLES CRUFT,

Brigadier-General.

HDQRS. THIRD DIVISION, TWENTY-FIRST ARMY CORPS,

Pikeville, Tenn., August 20, 1863.

Lieutenant Colonel LYNE STARLING,

Chief of Staff, Twenty-first Army Corps:

COLONEL: I send a courier to Jamestown this afternoon. Am glad to learn that we have so good a neighbor there.

On the 21st I sent train to McMinnville for supplies; it is due this evening or to-morrow. On the 24th sent another, and intend to start another. We are supplied with rations to the 27th, inclusive.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. P. VAN CLEVE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding Third Division.

HDQRS. THIRD DIVISION, TWENTY-FIRST ARMY CORPS,

Pikeville, Tenn., August 20, 1863.

Lieutenant Colonel LYNE STARLING,

Chief of Staff, Twenty-first Army Corps:

COLONEL: Colonel Minty started this afternoon on the expedition designated in instructions from department headquarters. I wrote last evening inquiring if he was expected to remain out or to return when he obtained all information possible. He is short of forage. His train arrived to-day from McMinnviller with but two days' forage, bringing all that could he had at McMinnville. As our supplies were received at that point from Nashville, we were obliged to take what we could get and be thankful. My letter of instructions was received but an hour and a half before my command was in motion.