War of the Rebellion: Serial 052 Page 0090 KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., N. ALA., AND N. GA. Chapter XLII.

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HEADQUARTERS TWENTY-FIRST ARMY CORPS,

Dunlap, August 20, 1863-11 a.m.

General GARFIELD:

I dispatched you yesterday at 4 p.m., via Tracy City, after my arrival here.

Van Cleve Reached Pikeville yesterday at 11 a. m., and Minty at night. He found Dibrell at Sparta on Monday night, with a strong force equal to his own, drove him to Yankeetown and Kingston, pursuing him till 8 p.m., taking 18 prisoners. Our loss 15 wounded.

His command is so reduced by broken-down horses that he has but 1,200 mounted men with him.

Palmer left this morning with a brigade and part of Wilder's command. Wood reports satisfactory progress.

If the line of couriers and telegraph cannot be worked via Tracy City, would it not be well for General Reynolds to open a line of couriers from Jasper to Therman? It is only 17 miles from Jasper to Stevenson, and nearly as far in miles as from here to Tracy City as it is to Jasper, with great advantage of roads by Jasper. Have you any news from Charleston?

T. L. CRITTENDEN,

Major-General.

POE'S TAVERN,

August 20, 1863-5.35 p.m.

Captain P. P. OLDERSHAW,

Assistant Adjutant-General, &c.:

CAPTAIN: Hazen's column is not yet in, but is near here. The hill on this side is quite steep, and I have ordered his battery to remain on the hill with one regiment and will camp the other here. Colonel Wilder has not advanced beyond here. He found a small picket at this point and attacked it, wounding 2. Took several prisoners and three Government (rebel) wagons.

We hear of no enemy on this side of the river, though they are near, up as far as Harrison certainly. The rumors are numerous, though none look to the "immediate evacuation of Chattanooga." Prisoners say that troops are camped within a distance of 20 miles, though but one division there (Cheatham's).

By the way, on looking closely at the order directing this reconnaissance, I think it doubtful whether it was intended that my "brigade of infantry" should move with artillery. This doubt and the difficulty of getting back has determined me to leave my guns on the hill.

Respectfully,

JOHN M. PALMER,

Major-General.

TOP OF HILL, 1 1/2 MILES FROM POE'S,

Thursday, August 20, 1863-5 p.m.

General CRUFT:

MY DEAR GENERAL: We have got on finely to this point, only have lost a long time by the cavalry passing. It was fortunate that