War of the Rebellion: Serial 051 Page 0774 KY.,SW. VA.,TENN.,MISS.,N. ALA.,AND N. GA. Chapter XLII.

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guard. We charged the pickets stationed as town guard and pursued them to within a near distance of the stockade, where, after some firing on both sides, we succeeded in capturing and bringing off 15 prisoners.

The officers and men of my command acquitted themselves creditably.

Yours, respectfully and obediently,

H. L. DUNCAN,

Captain Co. F, First Mississippi Regt. Partisan Rangers.

Lieutenant Colonel L. B. HOVIS,

Comdg. First Mississippi Regiment Partisan Rangers.

Numbers 21.

Report of Lieutenant Colonel W. L. Duckworth, Seventh Tennessee Cavalry.

HDQRS. SEVENTH TENNESSEE CAVALRY, Near Belmont, October 20, 1863.

CAPTAIN: On the morning of the 5th, in accordance with previous orders, I moved with my command on Holly Springs, which place I occupied about 10 a. m. On evening of the same day I was ordered to encamp 5 miles northeast of town and to move on the enemy's position at daylight the next morning, which I did. After some slight skirmishing with the enemy's advance, I was ordered to move rapidly on the enemy's position on the Coldwater. Before becoming engaged I was ordered to cross at Lockhart's Mill and assault the enemy in his rear.

While moving forward in execution of this order, I received another order to halt and hold the crossing until further orders, all of which I did, and afterward moved into camp near Scales' Depot, on Mississippi Central and Tennessee Railroad, by order of the general commanding.

Nothing worthy of note occurred on the 7th.

Early on the morning of the 8th, I was ordered to move up and support Lieutenant-Colonel Hovis at Salem in an engagement then threatening. Some two hours after taking position on his left I was ordered to withdraw as quietly as possible and take the advance in direction of Holly Springs. After moving some 2 miles Lieutenant-Colonel McCulloch informed me he was directed by the general to move his column in my advance, which he did. After making a circuit of about 10 miles, I received an order from the general to follow Colonel McCulloch in a charge upon the enemy wherever I found him. I then supposed we were to fall on the enemy's rear, but when within about 2 miles of Salem, Colonel McCulloch halted, sent me word the enemy had not moved out on the Holly Springs road, but was still in position in town; that he was ordered to charge him, and should do it. To which I replied that I was ordered to follow him, and if he made the charge I should certainly follow. I followed close in his rear until we reached town, and was surprised to see him dismount instead of charge, but supposed the position of the enemy had changed the general's programme, and that Colonel McCulloch was acting under orders. I immediately applied for orders myself,