War of the Rebellion: Serial 051 Page 0696 Chapter XIII. KY.,SW.VA.,TENN.,MISS.,N.ALA.,AND N.GA.

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G. F. Hayden, first lieutenant Company F, Seventeenth Indiana. N. S. Smith, first lieutenant Company A, Seventeenth Indiana.

The following is a statement of the killed, wounded, and missing from my command:

Regiments. Killed. Wounded. Prisoners. Total.

98th Illinois 1 2 - 3

Volunteers

123rd Illinois 6 38 4 48

Volunteers

17th Indiana 6 35 - 41

Volunteers

72nd Indiana - 4 - 4

Volunteers

Total 13 79 4 96

I am, lieutenant, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. O. MILLER,

Colonel 72nd Regt. Indiana Vols., Comdg. Mounted Infantry.

Lieutenant MOORE,

Aide-de-Camp, and Actg. Asst. Adjt. General

Numbers 16.

Report of Colonel William J. Palmer, Fifteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry (unattached).

HEADQUARTERS ANDERSON CAVALRY,

At Robinson's, on Pikeville Road, 2 Miles N. of Hinson's

(Or foot of Mountain at Poe Road), October 4, 1863-5 p. m.

GENERAL: I have my men picketing and guarding the two roads in the Sequatchie Valley, at points north of the Poe road and the trails leading up the Cumberland Mountains, between the Robinson trail (9 miles north of Dunlap), which was taken by General Crook's division and Wilder's command, and the Hill road (opposite Dunlap), taken by General Mitchell with Colonel McCook and Colonel Campbell.

I caught up with General Mitchell on the last-named road on top of the mountain 2 miles from the brow, at 2 p. m. to-day. He had just reached that point with the head of his column, the rebels having over a day the start. The rebels began going up the same road at 3 p. m. on Friday after the fight, near Anderson's, and kept going all night. At daybreak the next morning Colonel McCook caught up with them on top of the mountain, and, after a slight skirmish, recaptured 200 mules. The pursuit was not continued, and our men returned. Some of the rebels took the Therman road. General Crook went up the Robinson trace, evening before last, so that he should have headed off Wheeler's party that destroyed the trains.

I do not think over 2,000 came down the Sequatchie Valley; they had no cannon. General Mitchell thinks Forrest went with the rest over the mountain from Pikeville toward McMinnvile.

The loss of the rebels in the fight near Anderson's on Friday afternoon was 120 killed and wounded (60 killed, chiefly with saber) and 87 prisoners, including Wheeler's assistant adjutant-general and some 8 other officers.