War of the Rebellion: Serial 051 Page 0619 Chapter XIII. THE EAST TENNESSEE CAMPAIGN.

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treat in that honorable mode which such a soldier merits; and for this reason, if for no other, I feel anxious to spare nothing which may prevent a cruel and totally needless effusion of blood. You may have remarked that I did not allow my artillery to reply to yours this day. I shall place tomorrow some of it in position, but will not open fire before 12 o'clock, as you have requested. I hope, however, that long before that hour you will have surrendered. Should you agree to do so please report tomorrow to me by meeting me on the Harlan road, sending at the same time another flag of truce on the road you met mine on to-day.

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

JOHN F. DE COURCY,

Colonel Commanding U. S. Forces.

HEADQUARTERS,

Cumberland Gap, September 8, 1863.

General J. M. SHACKELFORD,

Commanding U. S. Forces, &c.:

GENERAL: I very much regret that a movement of cavalry followed your flag of truce sent in this instant. This may be susceptible of perfect explanation, and I would be pleased it should; but such movements in future cannot be considered other than hostile, and must be met in like manner.

I am, general, very respectfully,

JNumbers W. FRAZER,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES,

In front of Cumberland Gap, September 8, 1863.

Brigadier General JOHN W. FRAZER,

Commanding Confederate Forces, Cumberland Gap:

GENERAL: Yours of this date, complaining of a movement of cavalry following my flag of truce sent in this instant, has just been received. It was not a movement of cavalry, as you supposed, but pickets detailed to relieve others. I was not aware that the picket was en route for the station until it had nearly reached it. I at once dispatched an orderly to stop them. He did not overtake them until they reached the station. It was no purpose on my part to violate the rule; on the contrary, I regretted the movement of the pickets at that time.

I am, general, very respectfully,

J. M. SHACKELFORD,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES,

In front of Cumberland Gap, September 8, 1863.

Brigadier General JOHN W. FRAZER,

Commanding Confederate Forces, Cumberland Gap:

GENERAL: I again, in order to save the unnecessary loss of human life, demand an unconditional surrender of yourself and your com-