War of the Rebellion: Serial 051 Page 0618 Chapter XIII. KY.,SW.VA.,TENN.,MISS.,N.ALA.,AND N.GA.

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completely invested, and a short or a protracted resistance on your part will only cause a useless and, therefore, cruel loss of life. You may rest assured that if you deem it your duty for the above reasons to surrender to my forces, I shall likewise deem it my duty to see that yourself and all your command are treated with due respect and consideration.

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

JOHN F. DE COURCY,

Colonel, Comdg. U. S. Forces North of Cumberland Gap.

HEADQUARTERS,

Cumberland Gap, September 8, 1863.

Brigadier General J. M. SHACKELFORD,

Commanding U. S. Forces near Cumberland Gap:

GENERAL: Your second demand for an unconditional surrender of myself and forces of this date is received. In answer I would say that I have no cause to change my decision of yesterday, and consequently decline the proposition.

I am, general, very respectfully,

JNumbers W. FRAZER,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS,

Cumberland Gap, September 8, 1863.

Colonel JOHN F. DE COURCY,

Commanding U. S. Forces, Kentucky Side:

COLONEL: Your demand for an unconditional surrender of myself and forces is just received. I would state that a similar demand has been made on two consecutive days by Brigadier-General Shackelford, on Tennessee side, both of which I at once declined. I would further state that it is customary in matters of this kind to know the number demanding surrender, which I ask of you to furnish. I would also ask in connection with the above that some time may be fixed for a definite answer, say 12 m. tomorrow, as none was stated in your communication.

I am, colonel, very respectfully,

JNumbers W. FRAZER,

Brigadier-General.

General FRAZER,

Commanding Confederate Forces, Cumberland [Gap]:

SIR: I should not have the slightest hesitation in stating to you (as you appear to request) the number of troops under my immediate command, but cannot comply with your request for reasons arising out of considerations other than those connected with your defense of the gap. I once more assure you that in asking you to surrender, I was and am actuated by pure motives of common humanity, and I do firmly and really believe that your defense of the gap, however bravely and scientifically it may be conducted, will and must have only one result. I honor and respect above all men a brave and good soldier, and have ever and shall endeavor to