War of the Rebellion: Serial 051 Page 0617 Chapter XIII. THE EAST TENNESSEE CAMPAIGN.

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CUMBERLAND GAP,

September 2, 1863.

General S. B. BUCKNER,

Loudon, Tenn.:

The cartridges which were sent me from Abingdon never reached Morristown. Many cartridges in magazine are damaged, leaving me about 150 for small-arms.

[JNumbers W. FRAZER.]

HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES,

In front of Cumberland Gap, September 7, 1863.

General FRAZER,

Comdg. Confederate Forces, Cumberland Gap:

GENERAL: You are surrounded by my forces. In order to save the effusion of blood and the unnecessary loss of life, I demand the unconditional surrender of yourself and command by 3 o'clock, instant.

I am, general, very respectfully,

J. M. SHACKELFORD,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS,

Cumberland Gap, September 7, 1863.

Brigadier-General SHACKELFORD,

Commanding U. S. Forces:

GENERAL: I have just received your note of to-day demanding the unconditional surrender of myself and forces. In reply I have simply to state that I must decline acceding thereto.

I am, general, very respectfully,

JNumbers W. FRAZER,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS,

Cumberland Gap, September 8, 1863.

Brigadier General J. M. SHACKELFORD,

Commanding U. S. Forces near Cumberland Gap:

GENERAL: A flag of truce is just in from Colonel De Courcy, commanding United States forces on Kentucky side the gap, and I ask you to suspend any demonstrations until the same is terminated, of which you shall have immediate notice.

I am, general, very respectfully,

JNumbers W. FRAZER,

Brigadier-General.

SEPTEMBER 8, 1863.

General FRAZER,

Commanding Confederate Forces, Cumberland Gap:

SIR: I have the honor to request you to surrender yourself and all the troops under your command, unconditionally. The gap is now