War of the Rebellion: Serial 051 Page 0328 KY.,SW.VA.,TENN.,MISS.,N.ALA.,AND N.GA. Chapter XLII.

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the men were each time reformed and moved forward against the heavy odds confronting them.

We went into action with 272 officers and enlisted men and lost 81 killed and wounded.

Among the killed was Major John C. Thompson, fearless among the fearless. He fell as he had wished to fall, fighting the foe that had invaded his home.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. H. SHARP,

Colonel, Comdg. Forty-fourth Mississippi Regiment.

Captain W. G. BARTH,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

No. 350

Report of Major W. C. Richards, Ninth Mississippi Battalion Sharpshooters.

IN FIELD, NEAR CHATTANOOGA, TENN., October 5, 1863.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to submit to the colonel commanding brigade the inclosed report of the action taken by my command in the late battle of Chickamauga:

On Saturday evening, September 19, the battalion, with the rest of the brigade, left the position on the east bank of the Chickamauga which it had occupied on that and the day previous; crossed the Chickamauga, and were placed in position as a reserve to the division same night.

At 10.30 a.m. Sunday, we were ordered forward and quickly got under fire. Pressing rapidly on and mingling with our advance line we soon put the enemy to utter rout, pursuing him for a mile with scarcely a show of resistance on his part. In our pursuit we ran over several pieces of artillery and passed many prisoners to the rear.

Having halted and reformed, we were moved about 1 p.m. to connect with the general line of battle on our right. Advancing nearly a mile to the base of a range of high hills, without discovering the exact position of the enemy's line, the sharpshooters were deployed and instructed to move forward and draw his fire, which was done, finding him in strength on the crest of the hills. So soon as the enemy's line was determined, the sharpshooters were ordered in retreat and placed (deployed) in rear of the brigade to prevent the passing of stragglers to the rear.

With the exception of some 5 or 6 skulkers from the ranks, the men of my command behaved admirably, neither straggling nor stopping to plunder. Of my officers I can say that each of them discharged his entire duty fearlessly and zealously.

Very respectfully,

W. C. RICHARDS,

Major Ninth Mississippi Battalion.

Captain WALKER ANDERSON,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.