War of the Rebellion: Serial 051 Page 0149 Chapter XLII] THE CHICKAMAUGA CAMPAIGN.

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Army of Tennessee. Regretting that the expectations which induced the assignment of that gallant officer to this army have not been realized, you are authorized to relieve General D. H. Hill from further duty with your command.

Very respectfully, and truly, yours,

JEFFERSON DAVIS.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF TENNESSEE,

Numbers 33.

Missionary Ridge, October 15, 1863.

I. Lieutenant General D. H. Hill, with the staff brought by him to this army from Virginia, is relieved from duty in this department, and will report to General S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond.

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By command of General Bragg:

[GEORGE WM. BRENT,]

Assistant Adjutant-General.

CAMP MISSIONARY RIDGE, October 16, 1863

Colonel GEORGE WILLIAM BRENT,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

COLONEL: I have received an order relieving me from duty with this army, and directing me to report to the Adjutant-General at Richmond. As the removal of an officer just after a battle must be damaging to his reputation and character unless he can meet and rebut the charges against him, I claim that it is due to me to have distinct charges made against me, or to have the reasons given in full afro the action of the commanding general. I wish to know whether any complaints are made against me in regard to the discipline, management, and efficiency of my corps, or in regard to my handling of them on the field of battle, or to my own bearding and dispositions on the field. Is it claimed that through my fault the services rendered by the troops under my command were less important than that of other commands? A definite reply to these interrogatories, and a full statement of my alleged delinquencies will greatly oblige,

Your obedient servant,

D. H. HILL,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS CORPS, October 16, 1863.

Having been relieved from duty with this corps, the undersigned cannot part with the troops which he has had the honor to command in battle without expressing his appreciation of their high soldiery qualities and his honest conviction that the corps has no equal in the service. Your courage in the field, your patience on the march, your subordination in camp, your cheerfulness under privation, hardship, and trial, have challenged the admiration and won the confidence of him who parts with you with so much regret. Soldiers, may your past career be but the earnest of a more glorious future. May your