War of the Rebellion: Serial 051 Page 0026 Chapter XIII. KY.,SW.VA.,TENN.,MISS.,N.ALA.,AND N. GA.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF TENNESSEE,

Near Chattanooga, October 9, 1863.

SIR: In my report from this place, dated September 24, 1863, occurs this sentence: "But three small infantry brigades of General Longstreet's command had joined us." This was intended and should have been made to apply to the commencement of the action on Saturday, the 19th. Two other brigades of McLaws' division joined on Sunday morning, and rendered distinguished service on that day.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

BRAXTON BRAGG,

General, Commanding.

General S. COOPER,

Adjutant-General, Richmond, Va.

WARM SPRINGS, GA.,

January 3, 1864.

SIR: I forward the reports of the battle of Chickamauga by my aide-de-camp, Lieutenant Ellis. The maps of the battle-field have been so long and so unexpectedly delayed that I conclude not to wait for them any longer. They are daily expected from Dalton, where I left them nearly completed, and will be forwarded as soon as received.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

BRAXTON BRAGG,

General.

General S. COOPER,

Adjutant-General, Richmond, Va.

WARM SPRINGS, GA.,

January 3, 1864.

SIR: I forward the reports of the battle of Chickamauga by my aide-de-camp, Lieutenant Ellis. The maps of the battle-field have been so long and so unexpectedly delayed that I conclude not to wait for them any longer. They are daily expected from Dalton, where I left them nearly completed, and will be forwarded as soon as received.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

BRAXTON BRAGG,

General.

General S. COOPER,

Adjutant-General, C. S. Army, Richmond, Va.

WARP SPRINGS, GA.,

December 28, 1863.

SIR: Most of the subordinate reports of the operations of our troops at the battle of Chickamauga having been received are herewith forwarded, and for the better understanding of the movements preceding and following that important event the following narrative is submitted:

On August 20, it was ascertained certainly that the Federal army from Middle Tennessee, under General Rosecrans, had crossed the mountains to Stevenson and Bridgeport. His force of effective infantry and artillery amounted to fully 70,000, divided into four corps. About the same time General Burnside advanced from Kentucky toward Knoxville, East Tennessee, with a force estimated by the general commanding that department at over 25,000.

In view of the great superiority of numbers brought against him General Buckner concluded to evacuate Knoxville, and with a force of about 5,000 infantry and artillery and his cavalry took position in the vicinity of Loudon. Two brigades of his command (Frazer's, at Cumberland Gap, and Jackson's, in Northeast Tennessee) were thus severed from us.

The enemy having already obtained a lodgment in East Tennessee by another route, the continued occupation of Cumberland Gap became very hazardous to the garrison and comparatively unimportant to us. Its evacuation was accordingly ordered, but on the appeal