War of the Rebellion: Serial 050 Page 0996 KY.,SW.VA.,TENN.MISS.,N.ALA., AND N.GA. Chapter XLII.

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TWENTIETH DAY.

FEBRUARY 23, 1864.

The Court met pursuant to adjournment.

There were no proceedings in this case.

The Court was closed.

The Court was opened, and adjourned till 6 p.m. this day.

6 p.m.

The Court met at 9.30 p.m.

The witness expected not having arrived, no proceedings in this case.

The Court was closed.

The Court was opened, and adjourned to meet at 10 o'clock on the 23rd February.

TWENTY-FIRST DAY.

FEBRUARY 23, 1864.

The Court met pursuant to adjournment.

Present, Major-Generals Hunter and Cadwalader, Brigadier-General Wadsworth, and Colonel Schriver, recorder.

The Court was cleared.

After the reading of the testimony, the Court came to the following

FINDING AND OPINION IN MAJOR-GENERAL CRITTENDEN'S CASE.

General Crittenden commanded the Twenty-first Army Corps, composed of Palmer's, Wood's, and Van Cleve's divisions.

On the 19th September, 1863 (the first day of the battle of Chickamauga), his command consisted of those divisions, except Wagner's brigade, which garrisoned Chattanooga.

The evidence adduced respecting General Crittenden's operations on that day, not only shows no cause for censure, but, on the contrary, that his whole conduct was most creditable; for, by his watchfulness and prompt and judicious support of troops engaged, serious consequences to our army were prevented,a nd the enemy's plans from the day disconcerted.

Early on the morning of the 20th, General Crittenden's command consisted of Wood's and Van Cleve's divisions. But as about 8 a.m. Wood's division was detached to take post in Thomas' line, General Crittenden is not responsible for its subsequent conduct. Van Cleve's division was shortly after ordered to the left, and General Crittenden was to accompany it. As it was moving the attack took place, and the troops were broken and scattered by our retreating artillery and infantry, as well as by the furious attack of the enemy.

For the disaster which ensued he is in no way responsible. Changes were ordered to be made in the line. The break which occurred while the troops changes, was taken advantage of by the enemy, and disaster and rout ensued. It is amply proven that General Crittenden did everything he could, by example and personal exertion, to rally and hold his troops, and to prevent the evils resulting from such a condition of affairs, but without avail.