War of the Rebellion: Serial 050 Page 0893 Chapter XLII. THE CHICKAMAUGA CAMPAIGN.

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September 18.-Moved Colonel McCook's command up to within 2 miles of Blue Bird Gap and bivouacked.

September 19.-Received orders during the night of the 18th to draw in all cavalry from Valley Head and Dougherty's Gap, and keep closed up on right of Twentieth Army Corps, Major-General McCook commanding. Orders were sent at daylight to the detached portions of the command at the places above-mentioned in accordance with the instructions received from department headquarters, and at daylight that portion of the command stationed at Blue Bird Gap was in motion up McLemore's Cove.

The whole army was found to be in motion and the command moved rapidly up the valley, with some slight skirmishing, until it arrived at Crawfish Spring, where it was halted, formed in line of battle, and remained posted at this point during the remainder of the day.

September 20.-Command was engaged all day in guarding fords on Chickamauga Creek. General Crook, with his command, reported about 10 a.m. from Dougherty's Gap. The enemy attacked the forces at the various fords in strong force, and after severe fighting succeeded in effecting a crossing, but gained but little ground afterward, for they were stubbornly resisted at every step, and finally gave up the attempt to get in on our right through the cavalry. About 3 p.m. I received verbal orders from and orderly from General McCook to fall back, as our right had been turned. Not deeming an order of so important a nature as that, coming in such a manner, valid, I did not move, as I had been ordered in the morning to hold Crawfish Spring at all hazards, but sent staff officers to ascertain the position of affairs, and, if possible, communicate with either General McCook or Rosecrans. From them I learned that our right had been driven round and that everything on the right was moving toward Chattanooga up Chattanooga Valley. I therefore, after moving out all trains and loading into ambulances all wounded able to ride from the vicinity of my position, about 5 p.m. commenced falling back up Chattanooga up Chattanooga Valley. I therefore, after moving out all trains and loading into ambulances all wounded able to ride from the vicinity of my position, about 5 p.m. commenced falling back up Chattanooga Valley, bringing off on my retreat two pieces of artillery which had been abandoned by the troops of General McCook's corps, and collecting about a regiment of stragglers from the same command. The command bivouacked on Chattanooga road during the night.

September 21.-The whole command stood in line of battle all day in Chattanooga Valley, with frequent skirmishing. The enemy's cavalry were in sight all day, but no severe attack was made.

September 22.-In accordance with orders from department headquarters, at daylight whole force, with exception of one brigade, which was left to keep up show in front, moved into Chattanooga. The brigade left at the front fell back about 10 a.m., fighting hard as they came.

For the detailed reports of the many skirmishes on several occasions I respectfully refer you to the detailed reports of brigade, division, and regimental commanders.

Among the missing on the 20th is Captain James Hawley, Second Michigan Cavalry, acting assistant inspector-general at headquarters chief of cavalry. While rallying the Fourth Ohio at Crawfish Spring he fell from his horse wounded, and probably killed. Information through Surgeon Vaile, medical director of First Cavalry Division, who fell into the hands of the enemy that day, renders this probable, that he was killed. He was a young man of sterling