War of the Rebellion: Serial 050 Page 0827 Chapter XLII. THE CHICKAMAUGA CAMPAIGN.

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[Inclosure.]

Report of the effective force of the Second Brigade taken into action on the 19th day of September, 1863, Colonel George F. Dick commanding.

Headquarters Infantry

Command Commissio Enlisted Total Commissio

ned men ned

officers officers

[Headquarters] 8 30 38 ---

44th Indiana --- --- --- 27

Volunteers,

Lieutenant Colonel

S. C. Aldrich

59th Ohio --- --- --- 17

Volunteers,

Lieutenant Colonel

G. A. Frambes

13th Ohio --- --- --- 18

Volunteers,

Lieutenant Colonel

E. M. Mast

86th Indiana --- --- --- 20

Volunteers, Major

J. C. Dick

Total 8 30 38 82

Command Enlisted Total Commissi Enlist Aggrega

men oned ed men te

officers

[Headquarters] --- --- 8 30 38

44th Indiana 202 229 27 202 229

Volunteers,

Lieutenant

Colonel S. C.

Aldrich

59th Ohio 273 290 17 273 290

Volunteers,

Lieutenant

Colonel G. A.

Frambes

13th Ohio 286 304 18 286 304

Volunteers,

Lieutenant

Colonel E. M.

Mast

86th Indiana 241 261 20 241 261

Volunteers,

Major J. C.

Dick

Total 1,002 1,084 90 1,032 1,122

G. F. DICK,

Colonel, Commanding.

Numbers 187.

Report of Lieutenant Colonel Simeon C. Aldrich, Forty-fourth Indiana Infantry.

CAMP 44TH REGT. INDIANA INFANTRY VOLUNTEERS, Chattanooga, September 27, 1863.

COLONEL: In compliance with orders, I herewith submit a report of the part my regiment took in the series of battles near this point. I shall not notice minor points, but confine myself to important acts and facts:

On the 18th, my regiment and the Fifty-ninth Ohio were ordered about 3 miles to the left of our camp at Crawfish Spring, to support Colonel Wilder. We reached the point designated and formed in line of battle, in the after-part of the day, in a wood in front of an open field. Here our cavalry was driven in a little after dusk. I kept my line, expecting to see the enemy's cavalry approach, but they not showing themselves, and being left alone, your ordered me to fall back to a new line that was forming in the field. Here we remained till near daylight next morning. When the rest of our division came up we were ordered still to the left, in line of battle, when we engaged the enemy in large force, my regiment and Fifty-ninth Ohio in front, and Thirteenth Ohio and Eighty-sixth Indiana in second line. We had a severe fight, contesting the ground inch by inch. The enemy succeeded in getting around the right flank of the Fifty-ninth Ohio, which obliged them to fall back. My regiment being on their left, and the timber thick, I did not discover the movement of the enemy till some time after the Fifty-ninth left, when, discovering that the left had also fallen back, I ordered a slow retreat, fighting our way back to a small ravine, where I rallied my men again, brought them to an about face, and advanced a short distance and poured a destructive fire into the enemy's ranks. We were again obliged to leave the field. This we did in tolerable good