War of the Rebellion: Serial 050 Page 0798 KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., N. ALA., AND N. GA.

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[CHAP. XLII.

Numbers 175.

Report of Colonel David J. Higgins, Twenty-fourth Ohio Infantry.

CAMP TWENTY-FOURTH OHIO,

Chattanooga, Tenn., September 28, 1863.

SIR: I have the honor to report the following marches and engagements in which my command has borne a part since September 4, 1863, together with a list of casualties which have occurred during that time:

This command being detached as escort to wagon train crossed the Tennessee River with 19 commissioned officers and 310 enlisted men. Of these 27 were detailed in quartermastter's department and as company cooks, and 6 sick, leaving an effective force of 277 enlisted men and 19 commissioned officers.

Rejoining the brigade on the morning of the 5th September, we marched by the way of Nickajack and Squirreltown Creek to within 10 miles of Chattanooga.

On the morning of the 9th September, the Twenty-fourth Ohio, Twenty-third Kentucky, and Eighty-fourth Illinois Regiments, under your command, made a reconnaissance of Mount Lookout by a steep bridle-path, the Twenty-fourth Ohio in advance. Reached the top at 6 a.m., my skirmishers meeting and driving in the enemy's cavalry pickets. There we received orders to march upon Chattanooga. This we did, meeting no enemy, he having evacuated that place the night previous. WE camped at Rossville, where we were joined by the remainder of the brigade.

On the 10th, advanced on the road to Ringgold, skirmishing with the enemy and passing Graysville, reaching Ringgold, in conjunction with the whole of Second Division, on the 11th.

From the 12th to the 18th, were engaged in daily skirmishing with the enemy, feeling for his position and strength, in the neighborhood of Gordon's Mills.

On the morning of the 19th, the enemy showed himself in strong force in the Chickamauga Valley, north of Gordon's Mills. The army was put in motion to meet him, my command, a part of your brigade, receiving and returning a heavy fire throughout the day, never shrinking from the deadly contest except when outnumbered and crushed by mere wight of numbers. The battle was renewed on the 20th, and fought gallantly, when, after repeated successes and repulses, the Twenty-fourth Ohio being on the extreme left, was crushed, and with other regiments of the brigade was forced to give way, torn and bleeding at every part. The whole loss of this regiment is 3 commissioned officers wounded, 3 enlisted men killed, and 57 wounded, and 16 missing. The heaviest loss was on the 19th, and yet as severe fire was received on the 20th.

My present command is, for duty, commissioned officers, 15; enlisted men, 184; aggregate, 199. Enlisted men sick, 7; present, detailed, 30. Total aggregate present, 236.

Loss: Commissioned officers wounded, 3; surgeon, in hands of enemy, 1; enlisted men killed, 3; enlisted men wounded, 57; enlisted men absent without leave, 9; enlisted men missing in action, 16; enlisted men sent to hospital,4; Aggregate, 93.

Where all did their duty so faithfully it would seem invidious to mention particular cases. The brave Captain Wadsworth fell in the action of the 20th, pierced with two balls, and was captured by the