War of the Rebellion: Serial 050 Page 0687 Chapter XLII. THE CHICKAMAUGA CAMPAIGN.

Search Civil War Official Records

Mountain, and that they would probably endeavor to hold the gaps leading through the same to La Fayette, where they presumed a battle would be fought. Others seemed to think that the enemy would fall back as far as Rome, Ga. Though I endeavored to gain information from every possible source, I relied but little upon the statements of citizens who had either been subjected to such a system of despotism and tyranny that they were afraid to answer directly the most simple question, or who, from an ill-disguised sympathy with the enemy,were unwilling to give an unbiased opinion as to his strength, movement, &c.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. G. HARKER,

Colonel, Comdg. Third Brigadier First Div., 21st Army Corps.

Captain M. P. BESTOW,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Indorsements.]

HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, TWENTY-FIRST ARMY CORPS,

Gordon's Mills, September 17, 1863.

Respectfully forwarded for the information of the commanding general of the army.

The service of Colonel Harker's brigade was extremely hazardous, and was performed with great judgment, skill, and gallantry combined. The men and officers of his command deserve great praise.

TH. J. WOOD,

Brigadier-General of Volunteers, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS TWENTY-FIRST ARMY CORPS,

Chattanooga, September 26, 1863.

Respectfully forwarded.

This report of Colonel Harker furnishes another convincing proof of his great value to the service.

T. L. CRITTENDEN,

Major-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. THIRD BRIG., FIRST DIV., 21ST ARMY CORPS,

Chattanooga, Tenn., September 28, 1863.

SIR: In obedience to orders from the general commanding the division, I have the honor, very respectfully, to submit the following report of the operations of my command since crossing the Tennessee River, on the 3rd of September, 1863:

The troops, artillery, and ammunition of the First and Third Brigades, of the First Division, Twenty-first Army Corps, completed the crossing of the Tennessee, at Shellmound, about 9 p.m. on the 3rd of September, 1863. The troops bivouacked on the left bank of the river and awaited the arrival of the baggage train, which, having been ordered to cross the river at Bridgeport, Ala., joined the command about 8 a.m. on the 5th instant, nothing of interest occurring on the 4th.

About 1 p.m. on the 5th instant, my brigade, consisting of the One hundred and twenty-fifth Ohio Infantry Volunteers, Colonel E. Opdycke commanding; the Third Kentucky, Colonel H. C. Dunlap commanding;