War of the Rebellion: Serial 050 Page 0618 KY.,SW.VA.,TENN.,MISS.,N.ALA.,AND N.GA. Chapter XLII.

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In another place you say:

As most of the corps of McCook and Crittenden had retreated toward Chattanooga, it was deemed advisable to withdraw the left wing to that place.

I deem it my duty to the Twenty-first Army Corps, and my duty to you, sir, to say not only that no part of my corps was in Chattanooga, but that all except five regiments fought with the left wing in the close of the battle, and that these five regiments were cut off from the main army, which the left wing had grown to be, in the act of going to its support.

I did go to Chattanooga, and this, to some extent, may have misled the General-in-Chief: but no confused troops carried me there, nor did I carry with me any troops; in truth, I had none to carry.

Whatever counter reports or statements have been made to the General-in-Chief I engage to disprove by the general testimony of the army, officers and all.

Under these circumstances I most respectfully and earnestly entreat the General-in-Chief to examine further into the matter; then I am sure he will correct a report which does such cruel injustice to a corps justly proud of its reputation.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. L. CRITTENDEN,

Major-General, U. S. Volunteers.

COMMONWEALTH OF KENTUCKY, OFFICE SECRETARY OF STATE,

Frankfort, Ky.,[January -], 1864.

His Excellency the PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES:

DEAR SIR: I inclose you an attested copy of resolutions, of the Kentucky Legislature adopted on the 14th December, 1863, in regard to the investigation of the conduct of Major General Thomas L. Crittenden at the battle of Chickamauga. The apparent delay in not forwarding the copy at an earlier day was produced by the press of business.

With the kindest regards for your health and prosperity, I remain, your obedient servant,

E. L. VAN WINKLE.

[Inclosure.]

RESOLUTIONS IN RELATION TO MAJOR-GENERAL CRITTENDEN.

The fame of its true, brave, and patriotic men is a part of the wealth of a nation; that of patriots which has been tested in battle is doubly prized by a grateful people. The people of Kentucky are grateful; they honor and love those gallant sons who in this terrible civil was have been found struggling to maintain the nationality of the Government of the United States and the ancient renown of the Commonwealth.

In the list of those living worthies prominent among all is the name of Thomas L. Crittenden; his unshadowed patriotism, his modesty, and his courage have been signalized from the beginning of this rebellion, while his fitness for military command and his dauntless courage were conspicuous and eminently recognized at Shiloh, Stone's River, and many other battle-fields. This Legislature had heard that he has been relieved of his command and ordered to report to a military court for the examination of his conduct at Chickamauga.