War of the Rebellion: Serial 050 Page 0455 Chapter XIII. THE CHICKAMAUGA CAMPAIGN.

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they taking off their wounded in their retreat. Officers and men behaved with courage and coolness.

At Ringgold I left the brigade, continuing my march to La Fayette, but by order of Colonel Wilder proceeded via Rossville. About 8 miles out my advance was fired upon. I rode to the foot of the hill with Captain Van Buskirk, in command of the advance guard, and again drew their fire over our heads, and discovered the enemy were on a cross-road south of and leading into the road I was traveling. I ordered three companies forward dismounted, and one along the hill southward mounted. These dispositions were not completed when I discovered a wagon train approaching on our road from the direction of Rossville, and the rebels about 30 or 40 strong charging on to it with a yell as it crossed the intersecting point of the roads. My dismounted companies pressed rapidly forward over the open field to cut them off, but they discovered the movement, left the train, and retreated, receiving a volley from us as they passed. I ordered them followed by one company, Captain Hawk, who followed them 3 miles, but could not overtake them. Captain Preston sent to the left at first, reported seeing about 600 who all retreated on the return of the party that charged the train. We marched to Rossville that night.

On the 12th, after receiving orders through General Garfield, I started with my regiment to report temporarily to General Crittenden, at Gordon's Mills, but 7 miles out was overtaken by a courier with orders for me to countermarched and go via Summertown. I immediately countermarched, and reported in person at department headquarters and was ordered to establish a courier line from Summertown to Major-General Thomas' headquarters at Stevens' Gap. I left Summertown with my regiment after dark and marched along the top of Lookout Mountain, 20 miles, establishing a courier line, and reaching General Thomas' headquarters at Stevens' Gap. I left Summertown with my regiment after dark and marched along the top of Lookout Mountain, 20 miles, establishing a courier line, and reaching General Thomas' headquarters at 4 a. m. September 13.

September 14, by order Major-General Reynolds, I marched with balance of my command (seven companies) to Gordon's Mills, and opened communication with General Crittenden. I returned through the ridges of Mission Ridge, reaching Pond Spring at night, scouting the country well north and west of Chickamauga River, between Gordon's Mills and Pond Spring. I sent a large party of scouts toward Wicker's Gap, who drove in the enemy's pickets on the road from Gordon's Mills to La Fayette. My scouts were fired upon by the pickets of the enemy, at a bridge over the Chickamauga, 4 miles down from Pond Spring, and reported all the pickets of the enemy withdrawn across the Chickamauga from Gordon's Mills to Pond Spring.

Most respectfully, your obedient servant,

SMITH D. ATKINS,

Colonel Ninety-second Illinois Volunteers.

Captain ALEXANDER A. RICE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. NINETY-SECOND ILL. VOL. (MOUNTED) INFTY.,

Harrison's Landing, Tenn., September 27, 1863.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor, in continuation of my report, to state that on the 17th instant, while in camp at Pond Spring, Ga., I was ordered by Major-General Reynolds to send a company to report to