War of the Rebellion: Serial 050 Page 0220 KY.,SW.VA.,TENN., MISS., N.ALA., AND N.GA. Chapter XLII.

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CHATTANOOGA, October 17-10 a.m.

Skies clear; barometer indicates fair weather. Courier from Burnside reports rains much heavier in East Tennessee than here, and streams more swollen. Tennessee here still rising, but Sequatchie falling. Wagons will probably be able to ford near Jasper to-day. Colonel Atkins, commanding at Dallas [Harrison's Landing?], reports some small indications of rebel purpose to cross in that vicinity.

Atlanta papers of 13th report that previous to Jeff. Davis' visit here he sent an aide, who reported that the dissensions in Bragg's

army could only be composed by Davis himself. Deserters report rebel bridge across Chickamauga carried away, and army on short rations in consequence.

No news from Sherman. Weather warm.

[C. A. DANA.]

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

[Secretary of War.]

CHATTANOOGA, October 17-11 a.m.

The general organization of this army is inefficient and its discipline defective. The former proceeds from the fact that General [Rosecrans] insists on personally directing every department, and keeps every one waiting and uncertain till he himself can directly supervise every operation. The latter proceeds from his utter lack of firmness, his passion for universal applause, and his incapacity to hurt any man's feelings by just severity. It is certain that if it had been left to him, McCook and Crittenden might have lost other battles and fled from other fields without a word of censure. As I have already reported, McCook got from him a whitewashing letter, and Crittenden might have got one had he not been too proud to ask for it. In the same way he gave Negley a similar letter, although he had repeatedly declared that he ought to be shot, and although the official reports of General Brannan, General Wood, and Colonel Harker leave no doubt of his guilt. I learn, on the best evidence, that a few months ago General Stanley defeated and important operation by being drunk at the critical moment, and that he has repeatedly been guilty of that offense while in the discharge of most important duties in the field, yet General Rosecrans has never taken any notice of the fact. He cannot bear to hurt Stanley's feelings, and prefers, instead, to jeopardize the cause of the country. Another illustration is found in the case of General Rousseau, who is discontented because he only commands a division. General Rosecrans told me on Thursday that he was thinking of giving him the command of all Tennessee lately held by Granger, and requiring all his extraordinary talent, quickness, and energy.

There is thus practically no discipline for superior officers, and of course the evil, though less pernicious in the lower grades, is everywhere perceptible.

[C. A. DANA.]

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

[Secretary of War.]

CHATTANOOGA, October 18-11 a.m.

Rain began again about midnight and still continues, but the barometer is rising and the wind has shifted, so that we hope for